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2021

Global Heating May Lead to Epidemic of Kidney Disease, THE GUARDIAN, October 21, 2021

This repetitive low-grade assault on the kidneys does not necessarily come with symptoms, so workers may not even know they are getting sick over time until things get so bad that they end up with end-stage kidney disease, said Dr Cecilia Sorensen, director of the global consortium on climate and health education at Columbia University. “I think we just have no idea what the scope of the problem is because we’re not doing surveillance for it,” she said. “There are some regions that are clearly hotspots but in terms of its prevalence and how serious a problem it is, I don’t even think we’ve begun to wrap our brains around it.”
   
Natural immunity is good. Getting vaccinated after being sick with COVID-19 is better., USA TODAY, October 19, 2021

Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, said it's frustrating to be this far into the pandemic and still have so little understanding of repeat infections.

‘Lurching Between Crisis and Complacency’: Was This Our Last Covid Surge?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, October 14, 2021 

After a brutal summer surge, driven by the highly contagious Delta variant, the coronavirus is again in retreat. But as winter looms, there are real reasons for optimism.[...]. Given how many Americans remain unvaccinated, and how much remains unknown, it is too soon to abandon basic precautions [...]. “Delta is running out of people to infect,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Columbia University.
  
Is a Really Bad Flu Season on the Way?, U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, October 14, 2021 

That's because face masks, hand washing, and maintaining your distance work as well at preventing influenza infections as they do at stopping the spread of COVID-19, said senior researcher Sen Pei. He is an assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health, in New York City. "We know COVID-19 and influenza share similar transmission routes, so measures to stop the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 will likely reduce the transmission of influenza," Pei said.

Will the US face another bad COVID-19 winter? Cases are falling, but the virus isn't done with us, experts say, USA TODAY, October 10, 2021 

COVID-19 rates are finally falling again after a wave nearly as bad as the one last winter. Hopefully, we are through the worst of the pandemic. The virus isn't done with us, said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Delta has definitely changed the course of COVID-19, Shaman said, turning what looked to be the end phase of the U.S. pandemic into the start of a new wave. It's not entirely clear how new variants emerge, Shaman said. It could be because the virus changes as it passes from person to person, or variants could breed in immunocompromised people whose immune systems can't quite tamp down the virus. "Do you need a lot of people or just the right people?" he asked, adding that researchers aren't certain.

Sharp flu rebound expected after lifting of COVID distancing measures - Medical Xpress, MEDICAL XPRESS, October 8, 2021

New research at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health are published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. "In the short term, measures to control the spread of the coronavirus will likely continue to suppress the number of influenza infections, but after these measures are relaxed, with greater population-wide immune susceptibility to influenza could lead to a large outbreak," says senior author Sen Pei, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental health sciences. "This year, it's more important than ever to get your flu shot. While we're rightly focused on protecting ourselves against COVID-19, we shouldn't forget about the flu, which can be fatal."
   
Delta on the Decline? Not So Fast | MedPage Today, MEDPAGE TODAY, October 5, 2021

"We'd all like it to be true," Stephen Morse, an epidemiologist at Columbia University Medical Center, told MedPage Today. "There were similar conjectures before the Delta variant appeared and knocked all our assumptions for a loop…I think the most likely possibility is that the higher transmissibility of the Delta variant led to many susceptible people becoming infected and developing immunity," Morse said, calling this the "optimistic" take. Sen Pei, PhD, who studies the transmission dynamics of infectious disease at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health, wrote in an email that in addition to the risk that humans will loosen up on precautions, the role the season change will play is still uncertain. "The answers to some of the questions are inherently unpredictable," he wrote. "So it may be too early to conclude that there will be no winter waves." 

COVID-19 herd immunity is a mirage. Here's how the virus could become 'manageable' instead., USA TODAY, October 2, 2021

The optimistic expectation, experts say, is that the pandemic will die down, and the virus will become one of the world's many endemic viruses that continue to circulate but cause much less disease and death. ...“Once we get to the point where everybody has been exposed or vaccinated and if – and it’s a big if – COVID does what other respiratory illnesses do, it may be a disease that’s manageable,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University....But will this virus follow the typical path of others that we come to live with? “That’s the trillion-dollar question,” said Columbia’s Shaman. There are no guarantees with SARS-CoV-2, which can so quickly mutate. The worst-case scenario is that it evolves into something even more dangerous or more contagious than delta. 
 
U.S. confirms milestone 700,000 COVID-19 deaths - UPI.com, UPI, October 2, 2021

"My team and I could see very early on that this pathogen had the potential to kill this many people in the U.S., " Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences told ABC News. "I did not anticipate just how fractious the response would be, how leaders would not be able to or interested in unifying the country to come together and overcome political differences to combat the virus. "I'm saddened this did not happen. I think if it had, fewer people would have died and the economic consequences of the pandemic would also have been lessened," Shaman added.

An American tragedy: US COVID death toll tops 700,000 - ABC News, ABC News, October 1, 2021

Many health experts, including Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, already were concerned at the onset of the pandemic of the potentially devastating impact of the virus. "My team and I could see very early on that this pathogen had the potential to kill this many people in the U.S. ... I did not anticipate just how fractious the response would be, how leaders would not be able to or interested in unifying the country to come together and overcome political differences in order to combat the virus," Shaman said. "I'm saddened this did not happen. I think if it had, fewer people would have died and the economic consequences of the pandemic would also have been lessened."
  
Harlem's WE-ACT President Peggy Shepard Awarded With The National Order Of Merit By France, HARLEM WORLD MAGAZINE, October 1, 2021

To improve the environmental health of children in Northern Manhattan and the South Bronx, Peggy Shepard partners with the academic community through Columbia University’s Center for Children’s Conservation Health, where she conducts primary research. 
 
Delta surge complicated COVID calculations and expectations, researcher says - Reading Eagle, READING EAGLE, October 1, 2021

This fifth wave of the pandemic is an even more complicated landscape,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health science and an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York. “The trillion dollar question is: How many times will people be re-infected and what will be the mortality rate for that?” Shaman said. “We’re left in a bit of a messy situation,” Shaman said. “It’s easier to track whether a person has been vaccinated or whether they have had it before,” Shaman said. “Just because you have antibodies doesn’t mean you have protection. ”Some antibodies created by the infection might help some people more, and some antibodies created by the vaccine might help other victims, he said. “People will be repeatedly infected over the course of their lives and we’ll be asking them to get revaccinated,” Shaman said. “Herd immunity is not there…What we do know is that the risk posed by the vaccine is less than the virus,” Shaman said.
    
When Will Delta Variant Peak? Winter Uncertain As COVID Cases Drop in U.S.,  NEWSWEEK, September 27, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, echoed the point that the model indicates a downward trend for the current wave. "Our own projections have fairly consistently projected a peak around the last week of August/first week of September for the U.S. nationally," he said. "This appears to have occurred."
   
The US could see a brighter fall and winter as COVID-19 cases and deaths decline, a new model shows, BUSINESS INSIDER, September 25, 2021

"Things are looking like maybe they'll go quiescent and we'll have a quieter winter," Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University, told Insider.
 Also covered in Yahoo News

Has the spread of Covid-19 peaked in the U.S.? What future Covid spread could look like, NBC NEWS, September 23, 2021

Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease modeler at Columbia University, agreed that for the current surge, the peak in cases appears to be over. However, he cautioned that because death counts tend to lag case counts by weeks, the U.S. could still see deaths rise in the next few days before peaking. “I would imagine that it's going to be next week that we're probably going to see the peak of deaths nationally,” he said. “There may be some wiggle room there, but generally I'd say two to four weeks after the peak of cases, you can expect to see the peaks of deaths.” Shaman is hopeful that despite the lifting of public health measures in certain areas, the U.S. will follow the path of his models and continue to see a downward trajectory in cases over the coming weeks and months. “We have some governors and officials who are doing what seems to be their best to create conditions that are conducive for the spread of the virus,” he said, referring to the lack of mask mandates and even the outlawing of school mask mandates in certain states.

Meat accounts for nearly 60% of all greenhouse gases from food production, study finds, THE GUARDIAN, September 13, 2021

Lewis Ziska, a plant physiologist at Columbia University who was not involved in the research said the paper is a “good study” that should be given “due attention” at the upcoming UN climate talks in Scotland. “A fundamental unknown in global agriculture is its impact on greenhouse gas emissions,” Ziska said. “While previous estimates have been made, this effort represents a gold standard that will serve as an essential reference in the years to come.”
     
For Many Who Were Present, The 9/11 Attacks Have Had A Lasting Mental Health Impact ..., MICHIGAN RADIO, September 10, 2021

Researchers at Columbia University led the first effort to track the mental health of people who witnessed the attacks, surveying them in the weeks after the disaster and following them for three years. First, there was a study of Manhattan, and then funding was received to do a study of New York, southern Connecticut, and eastern New Jersey. The studies surveyed the general population in these areas, which included survivors, rescue workers and those who witnessed the attacks that day. What was found in the beginning was about a doubling of the baseline rate of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder in the general population.
 
The Vicious Fate Awaiting Syrian Refugees Who Go Home, WASHINGTON MONTHLY, September 10, 2021

A project at the Women’s Media Center, the map—the first ever to try to capture data on sexualized violence in war in real time—was produced in conjunction with epidemiologists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. It reported multiple cases of rape by the regime that involved sexual torture, including using cigarettes on people’s genitals, and gang rape. The new reports read like yet another chapter in a horrendously long and terrifying book.

Bequest by Denise Drace-Brownell to Columbia University to further the goals of her pioneering climate research, YAHOO! FINANCE, September 9, 2021

The Columbia Mailman School of Public Health Program in Climate and Health (CHP) instituted the first world class academic research and training program to further these goals through research beginning in the 1990s. Denise Drace-Brownell's attention to climate change began with her pioneering work at Columbia in 1992, "I am proud of the work the CHP is doing," she said. "There is also an immediate need for institutions to assess their own climate risks from operations," Drace-Brownell added. "Companies should conduct a comprehensive assessment via a multi-disciplinary team including engineers, risk managers, climate and health scientists, and business strategists, to assess projected climate risks.

COVID-19 Infected Many More Americans in 2020 than Official Tallies Show, NIH DIRECTOR’S BLOG, September 7, 2021

A recent article published in Nature offers a more-comprehensive estimate that puts the true number of infections by the end of 2020 at more than 100 million [1]. That’s equal to just under a third of the U.S. population of 328 million. This revised number shows just how rapidly this novel coronavirus spread through the country last year. It also brings home just how timely the vaccines have been—and continue to be in 2021—to protect our nation’s health in this time of pandemic. The work comes from NIH grantee Jeffrey Shaman, Sen Pei, and colleagues, Columbia University. As shown above in the map, the researchers estimated the percentage of people who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, in communities across the country through December 2020.

A new study of COVID-19 vaccination in the largest cities in the United States has found ..., FLORIDA NEWS TIMES, September 3, 2021

In a study of nine of the largest cities in the United States, researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health found racial, ethnic, and socio-economic inequality in COVID-19 vaccination rates across neighboring areas. Did. The study showed that vaccinated areas had more white residents, less colored races, higher incomes and lower poverty rates. Past COVID-19 mortality rates are also low in these high-vaccination areas, indicating a delay in the arrival of life-saving vaccines in the areas most affected by the pandemic. Also covered by News-Medical.net and Pharmacy Times.

Planting trees to offset the legacy of racist housing policies | Salon.com, SALON, August 28, 2121 

Out of all of the past segregationist housing policies, redlining is particularly illuminating because the maps left behind by the appraisal process make it relatively easy to study, said Joan Casey, an environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University who co-authored one such study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives in January. Research like Casey's has shown how the policy continues to shape the landscapes of U.S. cities. "Oftentimes we're describing inequitable distributions of resources, or increased levels of pollution in communities of color," Casey said, which doesn't point to why these inequities exist. "So assessing historical redlining," she added, "helps fill in the pieces of this puzzle."
  
1 in 3 Americans had COVID in 2020, according to new research, FORTUNE, August 27, 2021

Researchers from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health created an algorithmic model to glean a more accurate picture of the virus’s spread than was conveyed by data reported by states and locales to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). “The vast majority of infections were not accounted for by the number of confirmed cases,” said Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences and one of the study’s authors, Jeffrey Shaman, of the findings. “It is these undocumented cases, which are often mild or asymptomatic infections that allow the virus to spread quickly through the broader population.”

One-Third of Americans Were Infected with COVID by Dec. 2020: New Study, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, August 26, 2021 

“The vast majority of infections were not accounted for by the number of confirmed cases,” said Jeffrey Shaman, one of the report’s researchers and a professor of environmental health sciences at the Mailman School. “It is these undocumented cases, which are often mild or asymptomatic infections, that allow the virus to spread quickly through the broader population.”
 
One in three Americans had COVID by end of 2020, study says, NEW YORK POST, August 26, 2021 

A new study estimates that nearly one-third of the US population — 103 million Americans — may have contracted COVID-19 by the end of 2020, with only a fraction of those cases correctly reported in public health reports. "The vast majority of infections were not accounted for by the number of confirmed cases,” Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health said. “It is these undocumented cases, which are often mild or asymptomatic infectious, that allow the virus to spread quickly through the broader population.”....“While the landscape has changed with the availability of vaccines and the spread of new variants, it is important to recognize just how dangerous the pandemic was in its first year,” said Sen Pei, PhD, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
 
More than 100M in U.S. May Have Had COVID-19 by End of 2020, Study Estimates, UPI, August 26, 2021 

Researchers from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, who modeled the spread of the virus, believe that fewer than one-fourth of all cases were counted due to limited testing and large numbers of people being symptom-free, they said. "The vast majority of infections were not accounted for by the number of confirmed cases," study co-author Jeffrey Shaman said.
 
One Third in US Had Been Infected by SARS-CoV-2 Through 2020, MEDSCAPE, August 26, 2021

Jeffrey Shaman, professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and director of the Climate and Health Program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and colleagues developed a model to simulate how SARS-CoV-2 was transmitted within and between all 3142 counties in the United States…Shaman said: "It is vitally important when there is an outbreak and you're counting cases that there are many more people infected in your community who are contagious than reported cases. Each individual is infectious for multiple days, and there are many more unreported cases. That applies now with the Delta variant, he said.

Apps Are Helping People Avoid Air Pollution Amid Record Wildfires, Rising Temperatures, CNBC, August 8, 2021 

Air quality monitoring and measurement are critical for public health, says Yanelli Nunez, a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. She notes that robust studies have shown that air pollution contributes to lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lower respiratory infections. Nunez works in an environmental health sciences laboratory with Marianthi-Anna Kioumourtzoglou. Their research has also found long-term exposure to air pollution can affect the nervous system and may influence functions such as memory or cognitive capabilities. “Americans living in poor air quality areas tend to be people of color or low-income communities. ”With increased wildfires, the sources and composition of the air pollution mixture that we are experiencing could differently impact our health, so we need to better understand source-specific effects, especially for these newly prominent sources.”

Delta's Peak is Difficult to Project, But Could Come This Month, THE HILL, August 4, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health at the Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, aligned with Gottlieb with a cautious projection that cases could peak in about two to four weeks, followed by hospitalizations. But Shaman emphasized that such projections are clouded in uncertainty since they make assumptions about the future that depend on unpredictable human behavior, including whether officials will implement new precautionary measures in the coming weeks.“The reality is ... I don't think anybody knows what the policy changes and individual practices are going to be, how closely they're going to be adhered to,” he said.
   
Researchers discover DNA signatures associated with heart disease risk, NEWS-MEDICAL.NET, August 4, 2021

“The science is rapidly advancing in the area of epigenetics-; modifications to our DNA that are often environmentally driven and have the potential to serve as early warning sign for disease. In this study, we harness the country's best clinical data on heart disease from diverse populations to begin to unlock the specific epigenetic changes involved the complex biology that leads to disease. Ultimately, we hope the research will allow us to identify and prevent disease before the worst damage takes place, although developing appropriate DNA methylation tests is still years away, says Ana Navas-Acien, MD, PhD, study's first author and professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
      
When Will the Summer Coronavirus Surge Peak? It Will Get Worse Before it Gets Better, Experts Predict., THE WASHINGTON POST, July 31, 2021 

“Relaxing precautions, such as no longer wearing masks or engaging in social distancing. That probably includes behavior even among the vaccinated, Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman said. Shaman suspects cases among vaccinated people, known as breakthrough infections, are much higher than official tallies indicate…“The central issue is that people want to put the pandemic and the virus behind them,” he said, offering as examples unmasked crowds packed into bars and ballparks. Shaman said his team’s most recent model showed a peak in cases in four to five weeks, at which point there would be “a little over a million cases for the whole week” across the U.S. population, which averages to more than 140,000 cases daily.
   
Will Things Ever Return to Normal? It Doesn't Look That Way Right Now, SALON, July 31, 2021 

"Herd immunity is not relevant as we are seeing plenty of evidence of repeat and breakthrough infections," Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist, told the Post. Since vaccinated people can still "catch" the delta variant of COVID and transmit it to other people almost as easily as unvaccinated people, "in some sense, vaccination is now about personal protection — protecting oneself against severe disease," Dr. Shaman, said. “So it's not about the "herd," it's just about you.”
 
Where People Are Most Vulnerable to the Delta Variant, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 29, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, leads a research group that has produced its own estimates and found fewer vulnerable people than PHICOR overall. Dr. Shaman’s model showed broadly similar regional patterns, though measures of vulnerability varied by county because of the different methodology his team used. “The areas with the higher susceptible pools will grow at a faster rate,” Dr. Shaman said. “You’ll see a greater explosion of cases, it will peak at a higher number, and the overall number of people infected will be larger.”
     
'The war has changed': Internal CDC document urges new messaging, warns delta infections likely ..., THE WASHINGTON POST, July 29, 2021 

“I think the central issue is that vaccinated people are probably involved to a substantial extent in the transmission of delta,” Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist, wrote in an email after reviewing the CDC slides. “In some sense, vaccination is now about personal protection — protecting oneself against severe disease. Herd immunity is not relevant as we are seeing plenty of evidence of repeat and breakthrough infections.”
Also posted in HEALTH DAY

Matt Damon on COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: “I Fall Heavily on the Side of Trusting Science”, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, July 22, 2021

In 2020, Matt Damon participated in “Control the Contagion,” a PSA campaign that featured the actor alongside director Steven Soderbergh, writer Scott Z. Burns and other cast members from 2011 pandemic thriller Contagion. Following renewed focus on the movie in light of the pandemic’s start and nationwide quarantines and shutdowns, production company Participant Media and scientists from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health helped create the series of public service announcements that covered topics like proper social distancing and handwashing, offered tips on how to stay safe, and debunked myths about COVID-19.

As US COVID Cases Rise, Deaths Could Hit Some States Harder Than Others, NEWSWEEK, July 15, 2021

... Future COVID projections for the U.S. based on modeling "indicate a pronounced effect from the vaccines," Jeffrey Shaman, a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, told Newsweek—assuming they are as effective against current variants as they were in phase 3 clinical trials.
 
Prenatal Air Pollution Exposure Linked To Poor Response Inhibition, Academic Achievement, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES, July 15, 2021

"This study adds to a growing body of literature showing the deleterious health effects of prenatal exposure to air pollution on child health outcomes, including academic achievement," said study co-author Julie Herbstman of Columbia Mailman School. "Reducing levels of air pollution may prevent these adverse outcomes and lead to improvements in children's academic achievement."

Agents of Change: New fellows focused on justice and diversity in science, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH NEWS, July 7, 2021 

Meet our third group of fellows, who bring a fresh vision for the future of science communication and sustain the momentum of our growing program. Carlos Gould: PhD candidate in Environmental Health Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

How Trees Act as NYC's "Natural Air Conditioning Units", THE GOTHAMIST, July 1, 2021 

"What we find is that different parts of the city heat up at different rates," Dr. Lewis Ziska, a professor of environmental health sciences at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, told Gothamist. "The degree of heating, which can be as high as 7-10 degrees, really depends on the vegetation in the area. If you have an area that's well-vegetated, if you're living adjacent to Central Park for example, the chances are you're not going to experience the kind of extreme heat that someone in the South Bronx is going to experience."
     
"In the Heights" Celebrates the Resilience Washington Heights Has Used to Fight the Pandemic, June 25, 2021 

When the COVID-19 pandemic erupted, Crenshaw built on his track record. He worked with The Community League of the Heights, a community development organization founded in 1952, Word Up, a community bookshop and arts space dating to 2011, and students from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Together, they distributed food and masks, cleaned up grubby street corners, and got people tested and vaccinated.

The Pandemic Seems to Have Made Childhood Obesity Worse, but There’s Hope, The New York Times Magazine, June 24, 2021

Because children are far more likely to gain an unhealthful amount of weight while out of school over the summer, experts were worried last spring when in-person schooling was suspended indefinitely because of the pandemic. They feared extended closures might “exacerbate the epidemic of childhood obesity and increase disparities in obesity risk,” as researchers from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and colleagues put it in a paper in the journal Obesity in June 2020. 
     
Prioritize Vulnerable in Poor Nations Ahead of Children in Vaccine Roll-Out, Unicef Chief Says, The National News, June 20, 2021

A team at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in the US examined how refugees and displaced populations would struggle to access the Covid-19 vaccine. At current rates, poorer countries may not be able to widely vaccinate their populations until 2023, its data found. 
  
Expert Cautions: NY Should’ve Waited to Reopen, Associated Press, June 16, 2021

Amid celebrations after New York finally hit that 70% mark of all adults in the state having at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine, a word of caution: "I would have waited," Jeffrey Shaman, Ph.D., told The Associated Press Wednesday. 
 
Covid Cases Popped Up in US Weeks Before the Virus Was Recognised by Health Officials, The Independent, June 16, 2021

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University said: “It would be good if they could dig up the travel history of the positive individuals, as this will provide a more complete picture.” 

NIH Study Suggests Coronavirus May Have Been in U.S. as Early as December 2019, The Washington Post, June 15, 2021

“It would be good if they could dig up the travel history of the positive individuals, as this will provide a more complete picture,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, who was not part of the NIH research project.  
    
New Research Is Looking At How Heat, Humidity & UV Rays May Impact The Spread Of COVID, Yahoo! News, June 14, 2021

“The way it’s associated would suggest that in the wintertime, this virus will be more active, it will be more transmissible at that time of year,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman. “And that little boost is going to allow it to get around and preferentially cause outbreaks during the wintertime rather than during the summertime.” Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, coauthored the study, which looked at thousands of us counties from March to December of 2020. The story also aired on CBS 4 TV Miami. 
 
‘In the Heights’ celebrates the resilience Washington Heights has used to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, The Conversation, June 11, 2021

When the COVID-19 pandemic erupted, Crenshaw built on his track record. He worked with The Community League of the Heights, a community development organization founded in 1952, Word Up, a community bookshop and arts space dating to 2011, and students from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Together, they distributed food and masks, cleaned up grubby street corners, and got people tested and vaccinated. 
 
What Data Scientists Learned by Modeling the Spread of Covid-19, Smithsonian Magazine, June 11, 2021

Models are like “guardrails” to give some sense of what the future may hold, says Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “You need to sort of suss out what might be coming your way, given these assumptions as to how human society will behave,” he says. “And you have to change those assumptions, so that you can say what it may or may not do.”

Healthy Eating Habits Can Begin in First Year of Life, YAHOO, June 2, 2021 

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Brazil's Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre found that promoting healthy habits to mothers-to-be had an impact on toddlers' weight and diet. They found that those who were taught to avoid sugary and processed foods when they began weaning off breastmilk, usually at six months old, had kids who consumed fewer fats and carbohydrates at three years of age and had lower measures of body fat at the age of six.

How Many People Die When Polluters Exceed Their Limits?, WIRED, May 27, 2021

“There's a huge body of literature linking elevated levels of ozone to respiratory and cardiovascular mortality,” says Joan Casey, an environmental health scientist at Columbia University who was not involved in the study. Heart attacks, strokes, asthma attacks, the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—“those are the types of outcomes that I would expect are accounting for what they're seeing here,” Casey says.
  
Texas Winter Storm Killed Hundreds, BUZZFEED, May 26, 2021 

“We have a huge body of epidemiologic literature that shows cold temperatures are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, hospitalizations, and mortality,” said Joan Casey, an environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “We need to know who’s most at risk,” said Casey, the environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University. “Right now we’re missing big chunks of data and a lot of people are getting missed out of this accounting.”
    
Just How Big Could India’s True Covid Toll Be?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, May 25, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said that the “slider,” or sliding calculator, is useful for “exploring the consequences” of different values for the infection fatality ratio and the ratio of the real number of infections to confirmed cases. Those are “the two measures that need to be estimated,” Dr. Shaman said.
  
In 10 Years, COVID-19 Could Be ‘Just the Sniffles’, U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, May 25, 2021 

Together, the researchers’ models suggest, those factors could push SARS-CoV-2 toward “avirulence,” making it just an ordinary coronavirus within the next 10 years. The “hope,” Adler said, is that it would no longer require a vaccine. That trajectory is possible, but so are others, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City, who reviewed the findings.
 
Yes, There Really is More Pollen, Thanks to Climate Change, YAHOO NEWS, May 25, 2021 

Lewis Ziska, associate professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, the senior author of the report, said, “We still hear about climate change impacts as something in the future, but this study shows that it is already occurring, and there will be health consequences, especially for allergy sufferers.”
 
In 10 Years, COVID-19 Could Be 'Just the Sniffles', HEALTHDAY, May 25, 2021 

That trajectory is possible, but so are others, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City, who reviewed the findings. Instead of becoming just another "wimpy" coronavirus, Shaman said, SARS-CoV-2 might evolve into something like the seasonal flu: relatively mild in most people, but a cause of hospitalizations and deaths among the elderly and those with certain medical conditions. Shaman cautioned that the current study is an "exploration of how this might play out," and no one can predict the future. "Unfortunately," he said, "we just have to live through it." One important statistic to monitor, Shaman noted, will be the proportion of people diagnosed with COVID who die from it.
  
Study Finds Educational Intervention Improves Student Learning, THE TIMES OF INDIA, May 23, 2021 

Students exposed to Photovoice, an educational intervention, experienced greater improvements in STEM-capacity scores and environmental awareness scores compared to a group of youth who were not exposed to the activity, according to a study of low-income, urban youth in the US by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Also covered by South Asia’s leading news agency, ANI News 

What Does a Future Without Herd Immunity Look Like?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, May 20, 2021 

In the meantime, “public health officials and infectious disease epidemiologists are going to be looking over their shoulders going: ‘All right, the variants out there — what are they doing? What are they capable of?’ Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, told The Times. “Maybe the general public can go back to not worrying about it so much, but we will have to.” 
   
How Can We Best Engage Older Workers in Reskilling Efforts?, WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM, May 20, 2021 

By creating workplace environments that enable integration of upskilled older workers, we keep older workers empowered and in conducive work environments. Stakeholders of professional development, such as the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, have been driving efforts to reskill older persons with success seen by several small companies. These gains should be complemented by efforts to create enabling workplace environments for older workers, including making workplaces physically safer, eliminating widespread workplace ageism and bolstering support for older job hunters.
     
Air Pollution Takes a Toll on the Brain, SEATTLE TIMES, May 17, 2021 

Dr. Andrea A. Baccarelli, the senior author and a professor of environmental science at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, said these short-term effects may be reversible. “When air pollution goes down,” he said, “the brain reboots and goes back to normal. However, if repeated, these episodes produce long-term damage to the brain.”
  
Growing Power Outages Pose Grave Threat To People Who Need Medical Equipment To Live, NPR ONLINE, May 15, 2021 

“We have climate change coming, which is going to throw at us more of these curve balls, more of these unexpected events that can impact the infrastructure,” says Joan Casey, an environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University who has studied the health impact of power outages. Casey is among a cadre of researchers, environmentalists and physicians who are trying to draw attention to the growing threat of power outages for people with medical devices.
  
Frailty and Resilience: A Podcast with Linda Fried, GERIPAL (Geriatrics & Palliative Care for All Healthcare Professionals), May 13, 2021 

On today’s podcast we talk to Linda Fried, Dean of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and world renown frailty researcher about all things frailty. “I think we need new medical care support systems in-hospital and after-hospital and better rehab approaches for people who are frail,” said Dr. Fried.

With Busy Airports and Restaurants, U.S. Moves Closer to Full Reopening, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, May 13, 2021 

Public-health officials and epidemiologists say people who are fully vaccinated can safely resume most pre-pandemic activities with other fully vaccinated people. “The vaccine is doing what it’s supposed to do,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease modeler at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. Dr. Shaman said that if the U.S. was under 500 new cases a day, which has happened in some countries, then the virus is steamrolled. Variants of concern, particularly variants first identified in India and in Brazil, are the wild card, he said.
 
No Scientific Basis for Vaccine ‘Shedding' Claims | FactCheck, THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, May 12, 2021 

Micaela Martinez, an infectious disease ecologist at Columbia University who has studied the history of polio, said indirect vaccination is usually a good thing. It “has been a really great thing for eradication initiatives,” she said, and it’s usually not harmful because it uses an attenuated virus, with very little or no capability to cause disease. The only time it can be harmful, she said, is if the attenuated virus accumulates mutations that turn it back into its original form. But even then, she said, it wouldn’t cause adverse effects, such as fertility issues, that are outside of the pathology of the virus.
   
Power Outages Are Increasing. Can Medical Equipment Users Adapt?, MEDSCAPE, May 11, 2021 

“We have climate change coming, which is going to throw at us more of these curve balls, more of these unexpected events that can impact the infrastructure,” said Joan Casey, an environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University who has studied the health impact of power outages.
 
Power Outages Are Increasing. Can Medical Equipment Users Adapt?, UNDARK, May 11, 2021 

“We have climate change coming, which is going to throw at us more of these curve balls, more of these unexpected events that can impact the infrastructure,” said Joan Casey, an environmental epidemiologist at Columbia University who has studied the health impact of power outages.
  
Untold Victims of Rising Temperatures: Multiple Sclerosis Patients, GRIST, May 10, 2021

Joan Casey, the lead author of the study and an assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, was surprised by some of the findings. She thought patients might present with worsened MS symptoms, which can vary from patient to patient and include vision loss, pain, fatigue, and impaired coordination, during the summer, when heat is at its most extreme. But the data showed above-average temperatures had stronger effects on patients with MS in the shoulder seasons — fall and spring. “I’m speculating… but my guess is that it’s when temperatures don’t match up with expectations of what the temperatures will be outside that we really have this problem.”

‘Herd Immunity’ Dims with Pace Of Vaccinations., THE NEW YORK TIMES, May 3, 2021

Early in the pandemic, when vaccines for the coronavirus were still just a glimmer on the horizon, the term “herd immunity” came to signify the endgame: the point when enough Americans would be protected from the virus so we could be rid of the pathogen and reclaim our lives. … “That’s the nightmare scenario,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. How frequent and how severe those breakthrough infections are have the potential to determine whether the United States can keep hospitalizations and deaths low or if the country will find itself in a “mad scramble” every couple of years, he said.
 
The Pandemic’s Lethal Twilight, NEW YORK MAGAZINE, May 3, 2021 

“We’re in a footrace between the vaccine and the variants,” says Columbia University disease modeler Jeffrey Shaman. How that race plays out will make the difference between a gradually weakening pandemic that yields relatively few additional fatalities and one that drives the death toll to another spike. The experience of Michigan, where cases spiked eightfold between February and April even as overall caseloads in the U.S. were broadly declining, could be played out again and again in pockets of vulnerability.
  
New Study Finds Air Pollution May Cloud Older White Men’s Thinking and Memory, THE GUARDIAN, May 3, 2021 

“This work confirms that there is a link between air pollution and how well the ageing brain works,” Andrea Baccarelli, a senior author on the study and professor at Columbia University, told The Guardian. “These shorter-term effects are reversible: when air pollution clears, our brain reboots and starts working back to its original level. However, multiple occurrences of these higher exposures cause permanent damage.”
 
Reaching COVID ‘Herd Immunity’ is Unlikely in the U.S., Experts Now Believe, THE SEATTLE TIMES, May 3, 2021 

Over time, if not enough people are protected, highly contagious variants may develop that can break through vaccine protection, land people in the hospital and put them at risk of death. “That’s the nightmare scenario,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a public health researcher at Columbia University. How frequent and severe those breakthrough infections are may determine whether the United States can keep hospitalizations and deaths low or if the country will find itself in a “mad scramble” every couple of years, he said. Also picked up by Sun Sentinel

FIRST OPINION: Chelsea Clinton, Terry McGovern, and Micaela Martinez, STAT News, April 26, 2021

"With a lack of testing on the toxicity for a majority of the over 1,000 chemicals used in the fracking industry “we are left in the dark on their potential risk to human health. The unique impact of fracking on cardiac development and even potentially on the reproductive system shows that fracking may not only harm the individuals who are directly exposed but may also have health consequences that carry over into future generations.”
Chelsea Clinton is an adjunct assistant professor of health policy and management at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and vice chair of the Clinton Foundation. Terry McGovern is chair of the Department of Population and Family Health and director of the global health justice and governance program at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Micaela Martinez is assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
Co-contributors are Joan Casey, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; and Kandi White, Native Energy & Climate Campaign Coordinator, Leadership Team - Indigenous Environmental Network.
 
COVID Cases Plummet In NYC—Just as Demand for Vaccines Does The Same, THE GOTHAMIST, April 25, 2021 

“We’re starting to trend the right way with declining cases in the last few weeks, but we need to kick the virus out the door,” Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. “High rates of vaccination are key to making that happen.” … “In NYC, we would really benefit from getting more of the elderly and vulnerable vaccinated ASAP,” said Shaman of Columbia University. “PSAs, work with communities, we need these efforts to elevate demand and administration of the vaccine.”

Cannabis Tax Revenue Targets Violence Prevention, CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS, April 22, 2021 

In a 2018 Philadelphia experiment, helmed by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, crews removed trash and debris, graded the land, planted new grass and trees and added low fences to 110 clusters of vacant lots. Researchers examined police reports and polled neighbors about the impact. In areas below the poverty line, there was a 29 percent drop in gun violence near treated lots, per the police, a 22 percent drop in burglaries and a 30 percent reduction in nuisances like vandalism, public drunkenness and illegal dumping. Neighbors reported feeling safer and spending more time outdoors.
 
Tracking An Update, THE NEW YORK TIMES, CORONAVIRUS UPDATE, April 21, 2021 

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, who was involved in modeling last winter that said vaccines by themselves would not end the pandemic, set a far lower target for new infections: “Under 500 cases a day.” He said that would put the U.S. proportionately at the same level as South Korea last October, when that country was doing better at controlling the virus than it is now…He also  pointed to Vietnam, which has been aggressive in requiring masks and social distancing… In the U.S., older adults are the most vaccinated age group…Data from some states have shown drops in case counts among people over 65, Dr. Shaman said. “What we want to see is evidence of that same thing happening in younger people” now that vaccines are available to all adults, he said. “We want to see fewer and fewer cases.”
 
Rising Levels of CO2 Could Make Allergies Worse, NBC (Dallas Fort Worth), April 22, 2021

“Not only [are plants] growing more and producing more pollen, but the allergenicity of that pollen to produce an allergy is increasing,” said Lewis Ziska, an associate professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

Wildfire Air Pollution Linked to Jump in Atopic Dermatitis and Itch Dermatology Visits, REUTERS HEALTH/MD Alert, April 22, 2021 

“It is interesting to see a novel health outcome linked to wildfire smoke exposure,” said Joan Casey, assistant professor Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “The relationship seems plausible since we know wildfire smoke contains a host of toxic particles that might increase inflammation in the human body. “Still, “the authors compare visits during the Camp Fire to those in prior years…which may have increased over time making it appear that they increased during the wildfire when they actually did not,” Casey said. “Future studies may wish to account for indoor air filtration status on this effect,” Casey said. “I also wonder if any of this occurs through a stress pathway.”
 
Design Trust Launches ‘The Restorative City: Building Community Wellness through Public Space’, BROADWAY WORLD, April 21, 2021 

The Restorative City is being led by the Design Trust together with an Advisory Committee of leaders from public and private sector groups, including the NYC Department of Health, CDC/Healthy Schools Division, and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, among others.
 
Climate Change is Making Your Allergies Worse, VOX, April 17, 2021 

Attribution is the growing climate science field that seeks to figure out not just how the climate is changing but also to what extent human activity is specifically to blame — and what amount of change might have occurred otherwise, without human meddling.  … “Think of it as looking at a baseball player before and after they start using steroids,” said Lewis Ziska, an associate professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

COVID-19 Vaccines Will Fully Protect Tens of Millions of People. Thousands Will Still Get Infected.THE GOTHAMIST, April 13, 2021

“The numbers indicate clearly that the vaccine is having a substantial effect,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “People just need to reorient themselves and get it in their mind that it is not 100%.”
  
With COVID-19 pandemic still fresh, US developing early warning systems for future infectious ..., MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, April 12, 2021

"I don't know of a field that has ever predicted something that had never existed before," said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health…Shaman has developed rolling models that track the flu season and adjust week to week as new flu numbers become available…"It's because it's happening all the time that it's been predictable," Shaman said of flu. "You have a system that's stationary where the rules of the game are not changing so much…What we've seen over and over again is that an ensemble of models performs better than a single model. But you don't just throw all of the models together and average them…You see which models perform better and you give those models more weight."

COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Races Against Evolving Virus Variants, VOICE OF AMERICA, April 6, 2021 

Pandemic fatigue, improving weather and loosening government restrictions have led to an increase in infections and a sense of deja vu among experts. “There is a lot of concern that we're not doing the things that we should be in order to keep this virus in check,” said epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
  
Japan Just Recorded its Earliest Cherry Blossom Bloom in 1,200 Years. Scientists Warn it’s a Symptom of the Larger Climate Crisis, CNN ONLINE, April 5, 2021 

Think of Japan in the spring, and the image that comes to mind is likely the country’s famous cherry blossoms, also known as “sakura” -- white and pink flowers, bursting across cities and mountains, petals covering the ground. … “As global temperatures warm, the last spring frosts are occurring earlier and flowering is occurring sooner,” said Dr. Lewis Ziska from Columbia Universities Environmental Health Sciences.
  
Governor Cuomo Announces Statewide Launch of "Roll up Your Sleeve" Campaign and Encourages New Yorkers Age 16-Plus Who Are Eligible for the COVID-19 Vaccine Tuesday, April 6 to Schedule an Appointment, NYS.GOV, April 5, 2021 

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the start of the statewide “Roll Up Your Sleeve” ad campaign to encourage all New Yorkers, especially those from neighborhoods where COVID was most devastating, to get vaccinated. The ads will be shown on television and online statewide beginning April 7. The ads were directed by Contagion screenplay writer Scott Burns, and shot at New York City's Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Best Public Health Schools, U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, March 30, 2021 

The Mailman School of Public Health ranked in the top five nationally in the new graduate school rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report. The Mailman School of Public Health retained its No. 4 ranking and is the only New York City public health school ranked in the top 30.
    
New York Surpasses 50,000 COVID Deaths As Officials Warn That Progress Has Stalled, GOTHAMIST, March 29, 2021 

Both Cuomo and de Blasio have previously faced scrutiny for delaying social distancing measures at the start of the pandemic. According to one analysis by Columbia University, imposing lockdown measures in New York even one week earlier could have spared roughly 17,000 lives in the metro region. Also covered in MarketWatch: A Columbia University study estimated that up to 84% of deaths could have been prevented if the country had locked down just two weeks sooner.
 
Loneliness Is a Public Health Problem: This Low-Tech Intervention Can Help, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, March 26, 2021 

Now a new paper published in JAMA Psychiatry shows that a program of phone calls focused on empathetic conversation can help. Over the course of four weeks, the experiment saw an overall reduction in symptoms of loneliness, depression and anxiety in at-risk adults aged 27 to 101. “It makes sense,” says Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, who was not involved in the study. “In an emergency time like the pandemic, phone calls can make a big difference in allaying feelings of fright and anxiety.”

The Future of The Pandemic in the US: Experts Look Ahead, NPR ONLINE, March 24, 2021

“There are nightmare scenarios that we can paint out. And I can't say that those are such remote possibilities that we can dismiss them,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University. But I do think that this was probably the worst and it will continue to go down.” (Begins at 4:25)
    
How the COVID-19 Pandemic is Affecting Mental Health, ALJAZEERA, March 23, 2021 

According to a study conducted by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, released in March, the global prevalence of depression and anxiety during COVID-19 was 24 percent and 21.3 percent respectively. The same report showed that prior to the pandemic in Asian countries, the estimate of depression prevalence ranged from 1.3 to 3.4 percent. Rates of anxiety in Asia prior to COVID-19 ranged from 2.1 percent to 4.1 percent, while in Europe estimates of anxiety prevalence prior to COVID were between 3 percent and 7.4 percent.
 
Fine Particle Pollution From Wildfires May Harm Kids More Than Other PM2.5, MD ALERT/REUTERS HEALTH, March 23, 2021

“It’s a pretty compelling finding,” said environmental health expert Joan Casey, an assistant professor of environmental health science at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. “We know that stress is related to asthma attacks, so seeing smoke could contribute…Moreover, because everyone is tuned in to the news of the wildfire, parents may be paying more attention to their kids' breathing,” Casey suggests people pay attention to smoke warnings, stay indoors as much as possible and not exercise outdoors when there are wildfires. “If one has the economic means, purchasing an air purifier to create a safe room that can stay clean if it can be kept sealed would be a good idea,” she added. "If the findings (are reproduced) we really need to think about protecting lung health during the wildfire season," Casey said.

The Lasting Impacts of COVID-19 and What the Future Holds, SPECTRUM NY 1, March 19, 2021 

“There’s still a portion of the population that doesn’t want to take the vaccine, and that is working against us,” Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease forecaster at Columbia University, said in a recent interview with Spectrum News. Myths, misinformation, and maladministration are leading to hesitation surrounding the vaccine. Experts say people refusing to get vaccinated will result in this pandemic being drawn out even longer before herd immunity is achieved and the bulk of restrictions are lifted.
   
Study Reports High Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety During COVID-19 Pandemic, NEWS-MEDICAL.NET, March 18, 2021 

A study conducted at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports a high global prevalence of both depression and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic and shows how implementation of mitigation strategies including public transportation and school closures, and stay-at-home orders impacted such disorders. The results are published in Psychological Medicine.
            
Thank You to NBA, SEC, NFL and All Sports for Getting Us Through the Pandemic | Commentary, ORLANDO SENTINEL, March 13, 2021 

“The NBA was really the first to pull the trigger and say, ‘Economic consequences be damned, we have to put public health above this until we can get a sense of what’s going on,’ ” Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, told Yahoo Sports. “So I think that was a monumental event for the U.S.”
 
COVID-19 Deaths Falling but Americans ‘Must Remain Vigilant’, ASSOCIATED PRESS, March 12, 2021 

U.S. deaths from COVID-19 are falling again as the nation continues to recover from the devastating winter surge, a trend that experts are cautiously hopeful will accelerate as more vulnerable people are vaccinated.  … “We’re all desperate to get done with this,” said Jeff Shaman, who studies infectious disease at Columbia University. “We’re not in a place where it’s safe as of yet.”
 
COVID-19 Deaths Falling but Americans ‘Must Remain Vigilant’, ABC NEWS, March 12, 2021 

“We’re all desperate to get done with this,” said Jeff Shaman, who studies infectious disease at Columbia University. “We’re not in a place where it’s safe as of yet.”

How to Know that the End of the Coronavirus Pandemic is Near?, BBC NEWS ONLINE, March 11, 2021 

“It is not yet known with certainty how long the immunity of this coronavirus lasts, but based on the coronaviruses that already exist and that infect the population regularly, such as the coronaviruses that cause colds, we know that people get these viruses over and over again. once,” Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, in New York, warned BBC World. “We are still learning about immunity to COVID-19,” agreed, for its part, the WHO in its report.
   
Could Pollen Be Driving COVID-19 Infections?, WEBMD, March 10, 2021 

“If you're in a crowded room and other people are there that are asymptomatic, and you’ve just been breathing in pollen all day long, chances are that you're going to be more susceptible to the virus,” says study author Lewis Ziska, PhD, a plant physiologist who studies pollen, climate change, and health at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. "Having a mask is obviously really critical in that regard."
Also in Medscape
   
Study Reveals Increased Hospitalization Rates in Older Adults Following Tropical Cyclones, NEWS-MEDICAL.NET, March 9, 2021 

An increase in overall hospitalizations was reported for older adults in the week following exposure to a tropical cyclone, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University’s Earth Institute and colleagues at Colorado State University and Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. “While serious gaps in knowledge remain, we gained valuable insights into the timing of hospitalizations relative to exposure and how cause-specific hospitalizations can be impacted by tropical cyclones,” said Marianthi-Anna Kioumourtzoglou, ScD, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia Mailman School, and senior author.
 
Pollen Can Raise Your Risk of COVID-19 – and the Season is Getting Longer Thanks to Climate Change, THE CONVERSATION, March 9, 2021 

Exposure to pollen can make you more susceptible to COVID-19, and it isn’t just a problem for people with allergies, new research released March 9 shows. Plant physiologist Lewis Ziska, Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University and a co-author of the new peer-reviewed study and other recent research on pollen and climate change, explains the findings and why pollen seasons are getting longer and more intense.
    
Covid-19 Lockdown Linked to Uptick in Nicotine and Tobacco Use: Study, THE ECONOMIC TIMES, March 7, 2021 

A new study has found that pandemic-related anxiety, boredom, and irregular routines were cited as major drivers of increased nicotine and tobacco use during the initial Covid-19 lockdown. The findings of the study were published in the International Journal of Drug Policy. The research was led by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.
Also in Hindustan Times

Three Vaccines. Increased Manufacturing. How US will have Enough COVID-19 Vaccine for Every US Adult in May – or Even Sooner,  USA TODAY, March 4, 2021 

As vaccine experts welcomed President Joe Biden's accelerated timeline for distribution, they offered some caution about whether the companies can reach their promised doses and delivery dates. …Not everyone, however, will be easily convinced, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health science at Columbia University, who has been modeling COVID-19 cases nationwide. “There will be those who are going to need to be chided, or reminded, that getting vaccinated is good not just for them, but for their community and for their country,” he said.
   
‘Arms’ Race: Where We Stand One Year into the Covid-19 Crisis, PUBLISHER’S WEEKLY, March 4, 2021 

As we approach the one year anniversary of the first U.S. Covid-19 lockdowns, PW spoke with Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman, who offered a frank assessment of where we stand in our battle against Covid-19. “In terms of this milestone that we've hit where we've passed, 500,000 deaths at this point, it is an enormous failure and it is a real tragedy on a personal level for people who've been touched by it obviously, and collectively as a nation. We didn't do a good job,” Dr. Shaman.
     
ONE YEAR OF COVID IN NYC: De Blasio Looks Back, but has Optimistic Tone on Anniversary of City’s First Case, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, Mar 1, 2021

Cuomo finally agreed on March 22, though the delay may have cost thousands of lives — researchers at Columbia University found 17,500 fewer people would have died in the metropolitan area had lockdown measures gone into effect just a week earlier.
 
How to Tell When the Pandemic is Over, POLITICO, Feb 27, 2021 

The Covid threat will pass when the U.S. hits about 500 cases a day and about 40 percent of the population has been vaccinated, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. Right now we’re at 70,000 cases a day. Nearly 14 percent of the population has been vaccinated, according to NPR’s vaccine tracker… Shaman thinks we could get to about 500 cases a day by this summer, which would allow people to let their guard down. But one of the biggest threats to that timeline is how people act now. He sees even people who haven’t gotten vaccinated taking more risks as they see others resuming normal life.
  
How this Summer Could Bring the Pandemic Relief we’re Longing for, WASHINGTON POST, Feb 26, 2021 

“There are wild-card factors that could change this, but I’ve been telling people if there are things you’ve been wanting to do, think July or late summer,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease expert who leads the modeling team at Columbia University.
Also in Yahoo! News

As climate change extends allergy season, pollen travels farther, UPI, Feb 26, 2021 

Plant physiologist Lewis Ziska, from Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City, reviewed the findings and said they add "a new and interesting dimension" in how climate change may affect pollen season. "As climate changes [and] as weather become more extreme, additional pre-season pollen may become a very important aspect of pollen exposure and health consequences," Ziska said. "We will need to explore how similar events could be affecting pollen exposure in the U.S."
      
Entering Uncharted Territory, the U.S. Counts 500,000 Covid-Related Deaths., THE NEW YORK TIMES, Feb 22, 2021 

“The magnitude of it is just horrifying,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University who has modeled the virus’s spread and says that the scale of loss was not inevitable, but a result of the failure to control the virus’s spread in the United States.
  
Why New York’s Last COVID Surge Was Far Less Deadly Than Its First, GOTHAMIST, Feb 22, 2021 

“If there were no immunity by natural infection, we would be seeing a lot more people who have already been infected getting infected again,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease specialist at Columbia University.
   
Montana and the Dakotas Were Hot Spots. Until they Weren’t., THE NEW YORK TIMES, Feb 20, 2021 

Just over 8 percent of Americans — about 27.9 million — are known to have had the coronavirus, but for many reasons, including that asymptomatic infections can go undetected, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that the real rate is 4.6 times that. By those measures, at least six in 10 Dakotans — and most likely more — could have gained some immunity to the virus by the end of 2020, according to Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences who is modeling the future spread of the virus. And in some places, he noted, the share could be even higher.
 
The Coronavirus is Here to Stay—Here’s What That Means, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, Feb 19, 2021 

But the experience in Western Australia has provided a glimpse into a life free from the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. If other regions, aided by vaccines, aimed for a similar zero-COVID strategy, then could the world hope to rid itself of the virus? … Vaccinating even 55% of the population will be challenging in many countries. “The virus will stick around if parts of the world don’t get vaccinated,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease researcher at Columbia University in New York City.

Freedom from Poverty Should Be a Human Right, THE NATION, Feb 18, 2021 

After all, before the pandemic hit, Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health estimated that 250,000 Americans were dying annually from rising hunger, homelessness, and inequality, conditions that have only deepened over the last year. If the recovery from the 2007–08 Great Recession is any indication, expect difficult years ahead, even when the pandemic eases.
   
A Science-Based Guide to Dining Safely Inside Restaurants Now, GOTHAMIST, Feb 17, 2021

The amount of crowding matters to Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease specialist at Columbia University. “I prefer 25% to 50% or 100% [capacity],” Shaman said. But he also acknowledged that “businesses are hurting right now.” The New York City Hospitality Alliance has been lobbying for city restaurants to be able to open at 50% occupancy, as restaurants can in other parts of the state.
             
Researchers Warn Against Easing COVID-19 Restrictions Too Soon as Variants Spread, CBS NEWS ONLINE, Feb 15, 2021 

As more Americans get vaccinated for the coronavirus, some governors are choosing to ease measures like statewide mask mandates. Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University, joins CBSN to discuss his research team's model which details the estimated number of new coronavirus infections that may occur if guidelines are lifted amid the spread of highly contagious new variants.                                  
 
Researchers Warn Against Easing COVID-19 Restrictions Too Soon as Variants Spread, YAHOO! NEWS, Feb 15, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University, joins CBSN to discuss his research team’s model which details the estimated number of new coronavirus infections that may occur if guidelines are lifted amid the spread of highly contagious new variants. “Even though viral cases, confirmed cases are dropping, hospitalizations are dropping, and hopefully deaths will start to drop on a national scale too, soon, right now it's a race. And what we want to do, is we want to get as much inoculant, as much of the vaccine in as many people's arms as possible prior to them actually encountering the virus,” said Dr. Shaman. 
 
Virus May Never Go Away but Could Change into Mild Annoyance, ASSOCIATED PRESS, Feb 14, 2021 

“Are people going to be frequently subject to repeat infections? We don’t have enough data yet to know,” said Jeffrey Shaman, who studies viruses at Columbia University. Like many researchers, he believes chances are slim that vaccines will confer lifelong immunity. … “Very commonly the descendants of flu pandemics become the milder seasonal flu viruses we experience for many years,” said Stephen Morse, who studies viruses at Columbia University. It’s not clear yet how future mutations in SARS-CoV-2 will shape the trajectory of the current disease.
 
States Risk Repeating Last Summer’s Mistakes in Reopening, ABC NEWS ONLINE, Feb 14, 2021 

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University has modeled several trajectories of the pandemic with different steps taken to prevent the virus from spreading, including restricting indoor dining and mask-wearing. He said, “if leaders start allowing mass gatherings in places like restaurants or in-person schooling too early, it's more likely there could be another surge of infections.”
    
Winter Coronavirus Wave Ebbs and Deaths Drop, but Experts Fear a Spring Surge, THE WASHINGTON POST, Feb 12, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said: “Outbreaks are self-limiting. As you burn through susceptibles, as more people become infected and transition to recovered or deceased, there are fewer people who can be infected in the short term. So, the natural shape that an outbreak takes is a bell-shaped curve.”
 
What Will Life After the COVID-19 Vaccine Look like?, TEEN VOGUE, Feb 8, 2021 

Micaela Martinez, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, tells Teen Vogue we’ll likely need more than 75% of the U.S. population to be vaccinated against COVID-19 to reach that point, a similar estimate to one shared by Anthony Fauci, M.D. As for when that will happen, there’s currently no definitive answer.
 
The Need to Vaccinate: The Journey to Herd Immunity, SPECTRUM NY 1 (video), Feb 8, 2021 

“There's still a portion of the population that doesn't want to take the vaccine and that is working against us,” Jeffrey Shaman, infectious disease forecaster and Environmental Health Sciences Professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, told Spectrum News. With fewer people getting vaccinated, Shaman says it will take much, much longer to reach a level of herd immunity that allows businesses, schools, and everyday life to return to some level of normalcy. "We really do need to inoculate 70 percent of the population at a minimum, I would say, to really get ourselves in a position where we feel like we're starting to get comfortably safe,” Shaman added. 
 
100 Million COVID Shots in 100 Days Doesn’t Get Us Back to Normal, SALON, Feb 7, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health professor at Columbia University, said states should maintain covid restrictions, such as those related to face coverings, remote work and limited travel, during the vaccine distribution process. In a recent modeling study, Shaman and his colleagues found that if such restrictions were lifted this month, 29 million additional covid infections could emerge by summer. He recommends keeping them in place through July.
 
Why The Pandemic Is 10 Times Worse Than You Think, NPR, Feb 6, 2021 

A research team at Columbia University has built a mathematical model that gives a much more complete — and scary — picture of how much virus is circulating in our communities. It estimates how many people are never counted because they never get tested. And it answers a second question that is arguably even more crucial — but that until now has not been reliably estimated: On any given day, what is the total number of people who are actively infectious? This includes those who may have been infected on previous days but are still shedding virus and capable of spreading disease… The model has not been published or peer-reviewed yet, but lead researcher, Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease specialist at Columbia University, shared the data exclusively with NPR. Here are more of the startling takeaways.
 
Researchers’ New Model Predicts Number Of People Currently Contagious With COVID-19, NPR, Morning Edition, Feb 5, 2021 

This comes to us from a team at Columbia University led by Jeffrey Shaman. They have built a mathematical model. It starts out by estimating, for each day of the outbreak so far, how many people actually became infectious. “When we look at confirmed [COVID-19] cases, we’re really only seeing the tip of the iceberg as to how many people are currently walking around and unfortunately putting other people at risk with their infections,” said Dr. Shaman. 
 
A Rocky Road on The Way to Herd Immunity For COVID-19, NPR, Morning Edition, Feb 3, 2021

Scientists estimate that somewhere between 70% and 85% of people need to be immune from the coronavirus before the disease will wane through a process known as herd immunity. Both natural immunity and vaccines can play a role in achieving that goal. But getting there won't be easy. … Another big question is what to make of the people who have already been infected. Jeffrey Shaman, at Columbia University, estimates that figure at 105 million. That's about 32% of the U.S. population. If those previously exposed people are still immune, that's a big step toward reaching herd immunity.
 
So You Got the Vaccine. Can You Still Infect People? Pfizer is Trying to Find Out., MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, Feb 2, 2021

“There are three things a vaccine can do: stop you from acquiring the disease altogether, stop onward transmission, and stop symptoms,” says Jeffrey Shaman, a public health researcher at Columbia University. A perfect vaccine would create what is called “sterilizing” immunity, which means the virus can’t get a foothold in your body at all.
 
States Medicaid Expansion has Improved Maternal Morbidity, Columbia Study, CRAIN’S NEW YORK, Feb 2, 2021

New York’s expansion of Medicaid eligibility in 2014 helped improve severe maternal morbidity in low-income women compared to those with a higher income, according to a study from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Irving Medical Center.
 
Experts: Personal Behavior Key to Continuing Decline in COVID-19 Cases and Deaths, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Feb 1, 2021

Right now, it’s a race between the vaccine and the virus, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “Even though we’re on a downward trend, if we start opening up restaurants and whatnot, we’re not going to be on that same downward trend,” he said. “It might still be downward, but it might be less so. And you’re going to be accumulating more infections, cases, hospitalizations and deaths than you would otherwise.”
 
Better Behaviour, Fledgling Population Immunity Behind US Case Decline, BANGKOK POST, Jan 30, 2021

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia who has been modeling the population immunity question, says that according to his team's calculations, “between 50-70 percent of North Dakota's population has been infected with the virus.” While this is one extreme, Shaman said that between rising national-level population immunity, and current behavior patterns, the outbreak “should be self-limiting at this point.”

Racist Neighborhood ‘Redlining’ has Led to Fewer Green Spaces Today, UPI , Jan 28, 2021 

A racist mortgage appraisal practice used in the United States decades ago has resulted in less green space in some urban neighborhoods today, researchers say. …  "Future policies should, with the input of local leaders, strive to expand availability of green space, a health-promoting amenity, in communities of color," she said. [Joan] Casey is an assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. Also in HealthDay

Experts Say COVID-19 Vaccine is Not the Sole Answer to the Pandemic, CBS NEWS ONLINE, Jan 27, 2021 

President Biden says the U.S. is buying 200 million more doses of COVID-19 vaccines, but the process of vaccinating a majority of Americans will take months. CBSN's Tanya Rivero spoke with Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, about what the nation needs to do to bring the coronavirus pandemic under control. Also picked up by Yahoo! News

Vaccinations Slow as City Awaits More Supply, SPECTRUM NY1 (video), Jan 27, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, urges viewers to expect and practice COVID-related precautions for many months. 

Vaccines Alone will Not End the Pandemic, Columbia University Model Shows, BALTIMORE SUN, Jan 26, 2021 

The coronavirus pandemic in the United States has raged almost uncontrollably for so long that even if millions of people are vaccinated, millions more will still be infected and become ill unless people continue to wear masks and maintain social distancing measures until midsummer or later, according to a new model by scientists at Columbia University. Only then will the number of people with immunity be large enough to take the wind out of the pandemic, said Jeffrey Shaman, a public health researcher at Columbia who shared his team’s modeling calculations.

Why Vaccines Alone Will Not End the Pandemic, THE NEW YORK TIMES, Jan 24, 2021 

The coronavirus pandemic in the United States has raged almost uncontrollably for so long that even if millions of people are vaccinated, millions more will still be infected and become ill unless people continue to wear masks and maintain social distancing measures until midsummer or later, according to a new model by scientists at Columbia University. … Only then will the number of people with immunity — those who have had the disease and recovered, plus those who have been vaccinated — be large enough to take the wind out of the pandemic, said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia who shared his team’s modeling calculations.

COVID-19 will Likely be with Us Forever. Here’s How We'll Live with it., NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Jan 22, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious diseases expert at Columbia University, points out that the global push for vaccines also exposes existing inequities in global health. In a widely shared map from December, The Economist Intelligence Unit estimated that rich countries such as the U.S. will have widely accessible vaccines by early 2022, which may not happen for poorer countries in Africa and Asia until as late as 2023.

Many LGBTQ Seniors Don’t Get The Health And End-Of-Life Care They Need. Some Coloradans Are Working To Change That, PUBLIC RADIO (COLORADO), Jan 22, 2021 

One study, from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, found living in highly stigmatized environments can result in a shorter life expectancy of around 12 years for LGBTQ people.

Biden is ‘Inheriting a Disaster’ as Coronavirus Continues to Grip Nation Amid Chaotic Vaccine Rollout, THE WASHINGTON POST, Jan 20, 2021 

Exactly one year later, as Joe Biden takes the presidential oath of office, he will inherit a pandemic that has sickened and killed more people — and caused anguish and hardship across the nation — at a scale not seen since the influenza pandemic of 1918. … “He’s inheriting a disaster,” Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said of Biden. Despite the bleak picture, infectious-disease experts say there is reason for hope. Vaccines have proven to be safe and effective and, offer optimism for an end to the pandemic. … “The central unfortunate issue is that the vaccine is too late. It’s too late for most people. A third of the country has already had the virus,” said Shaman, whose research suggests that five times as many people have been infected as have tested positive for the virus.

The Virus Death Toll in the U.S. has Passed 400,000., THE NEW YORK TIMES, Jan 19, 2021 

“It wasn’t that he [Trump] was just inept,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences who has modeled the virus’s spread. “He made something that could have very easily turned into a point of patriotism, pride and national unity — protecting your neighbors, protecting your loved ones, protecting your community — into a divisive issue, as is his wont, and it cost people’s lives.”
 
400,000 Deaths in a Year and Failure at Every Level., THE NEW YORK TIMES, Jan 18, 2021 

Looking back, public health experts trace the bulk of the nation’s cases, now reflected in a record death toll, back to this turning point in late April. “That was the critical time,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease expert at Columbia University. “That was the opportune moment that was lost.” 
 
Two Cases of Troubling Coronavirus Variant Found In NYC, GOTHAMIST, Jan 13, 2021 

Two cases of a coronavirus variant that originated in the United Kingdom and believed to be significantly more contagious have been identified in New York City. … Similarly, Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences, said that the news should encourage the city to ramp up its vaccination among those 65 and older, particular those with pre-existing conditions. “This is the most important target group if we are to prevent hospitalizations and death,” he said.

One in 50 Americans Has COVID in Some Areas—Before New Variants Have Taken Hold, NEWSWEEK, Jan 8, 2021 

Jeffrey Shaman, professor in environmental health sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health Columbia University who works on a COVID model, said: “We’re already there [one in 50 people in the U.S. being infected with the coronavirus]” adding: “The U.S. has been at a similar level [to the U.K.] for some time.” Shaman said his team estimated that for much of December, more than one in 100 people were infectious in the U.S. and another one in 100 had caught the virus but were not yet contagious.

CDC Foresees Spread in U.S. of Highly Contagious Coronavirus Variant, THE WASHINGTON POST, Jan 6, 2021 

“If [the variant] starts to take over because it is more aggressive, the measures that we’ve had in place that aren’t working that great to begin with are going to be less effective in controlling the virus,” Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman said.

Eldera: The New Global Intergenerational Mentoring Program, FORBES, Jan 5, 2021

Eldera pairs adults 60 and over with kids — mostly between 8 and 13 — to nurture and boost intergenerational relationships. … The model for Eldera can be traced to Dr. Linda Fried, dean of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and a Next Avenue Influencer in Aging. Fried is one of the first scientists whose research documented that connecting the generations is good for kids and older adults.

Cleaner Air in Pandemic-Era NYC Reveals Possible Future, UPI, Jan 5, 2021 

The COVID-19 shutdown in New York City gave researchers an unintended “natural experiment” of cleaner air, where they could simulate what it would be like for future health and economics if improved air quality could be sustained. In their new study, Columbia University researchers asked, “What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring 2020 COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic?” … “Air quality improvements from the shutdown happened as the result of a tragic situation,” said study first author Frederica Perera. She’s director of translational research at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health and a professor of environmental health sciences at the university’s Mailman School of Public Health.

What If NYC’s Cleaner Pandemic-Era Air Continued?, HEALTHDAY, Jan 5, 2021 

In their new study, Columbia University researchers asked, “What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring 2020 COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic?” “Air quality improvements from the shutdown happened as the result of a tragic situation,” said study first author Frederica Perera, professor of environmental health sciences at the university’s Mailman School of Public Health.

2020

WHO Says COVID-19 Virus Will “Likely” Become Permanent Presence, Warns of Deadlier Pandemic Ahead, GOTHAMIST, Dec 29, 2020 

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor of environmental health sciences who recently wrote a paper about the scenarios in which the virus does become endemic, said he remained ambivalent about the outcome. He said that while he has been reassured by studies showing that people exhibit a strong and durable immune response to COVID-19, which would suggest that the virus could wane and disappear, he is also worried about the increasing evidence of repeat infections.

Sex at Christmas tends to be off menu until fireworks at new year – study, THE GUARDIAN, Dec 22, 2020 

The research showed that holidays – including bank holidays and Valentine’s Day – were always associated with a peak in sexual activity. “There was also a very strong difference between weekend and weekdays – people have more sex on weekends,” said Micaela Martinez at Columbia University in New York, who was also involved in the research. “It suggests that having leisure time with your intimate partner facilitates sex.”

Study: PA Heart Failure Patients Near Fracking Were More Likely to Be Hospitalized, NPR ONLINE, December 21, 2020 

Heart failure patients who live near fracking operations were more likely to be hospitalized than those who live farther away, according to a new study… Joan Casey, assistant professor in environmental health sciences at Columbia University, said in an email the study “adds to mounting evidence that fracking is related to adverse health outcomes.”
 
Multigenerational Households Confirm: The More the Merrier, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Dec 16, 2020 

Balancing needs – and risks – across generations has taken on new meaning during the pandemic. A 2017 study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found some health benefits to multigenerational living but also cautioned that overcrowded houses can be a risk factor for spreading diseases among family members.
 
Why Cold Weather Makes it Harder for the Body to Fight Respiratory Infections, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Dec 15, 2020 

Vitamin D production is not the only bodily function affected by seasonal variability in sunlight, says Micaela Martinez, an infectious disease ecologist at Columbia University, who studies biological rhythms and seasonal disease. … “Pretty much all the aspects of our body—metabolism, hormones, immunity—change with the day-night cycle,” she says.
 
How Much Better is a Tent? As Cold Weather Moves in, Ventilation will be Key in Preventing COVID Spread, WGN-TV Chicago, Dec 15, 2020 

Columbia University environmental sciences professor Dr Jeffrey Shaman has been studying virus transmission for years. “Colder temperatures and lower relative humidity conditions seem to favor the survival and transmissibility of the virus,” he said. So, unless you are in an individual bubble, if you are eating outside, in a large tent Shaman says there is some concern.
 
When Dr. Fauci and Other Experts Say You Can Expect to Get vaccinated for Covid-19, CNBC, Dec 14, 2020 

Pregnant women and children were excluded from both Pfizer and Moderna’s clinical trials, so it’s not clear whether these vaccines are safe for these groups. Studies on Covid-19 vaccines for pregnant women and children will likely begin in mid-January, Fauci said at Columbia University’s Grand Rounds 2020 event Thursday.
 
The Vaccine Arrives, THE SPIRIT, Dec 14, 2020 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the federal government’s top infectious disease expert, speaking by Zoom to an audience at grand rounds at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, said 75 percent of the population would need to be immune to curtail the virus.
 
Are Private Gatherings Really Driving COVID-19? Why NJ Doesn’t Have the Data to Back That Up, NJ.COM/STAR LEDGER, Dec 13, 2020 

We’d all love to have clear answers about where people are catching the virus but we just don’t have those answers, said Jeffrey Shaman, professor and infectious disease modeler at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “We’re still basically “flying blind” as we try to decide what’s safe or not, because there are too many variables, down to ventilation and wearing your mask correctly. We’ve done all these studies but they’re not stationary and robust enough to allow you to say, ‘Given where you are in this county, this is what you need to do now to keep yourself safe,’” Shaman said. “It’s not strong enough and precise enough, because of noise in the data, to allow you to make the kinds of very precise public health recommendations that I think people would really like.”
 
Dr. Fauci Details “Adverse Effects” of COVID Vaccine, YAHOO!, Dec 11, 2020 

Dr. Fauci says there haven't been any terribly worrying adverse side effects reported so far—and that, if any show up, it may be a while. “If you look at the adverse effects,” he said yesterday during Columbia University’s The Deans Grand Rounds on the Future of Public Health, aka “2020: The Year of COVID-19 with Dr. Anthony Fauci,” “one of the things that I think the general public didn't fully appreciate that if you go back to the history, as you well know in vaccinology, and you look at what are considered intermediate and long-term effects, more than 90 to 95% of them occur within 30 to 45 days of the actual vaccination.

Dr. Fauci says Covid vaccine trials on pregnant women and young kids could begin in January, CNBC ONLINE,  Dec 10, 2020 

[Dr. Anthony] Fauci noted Thursday in a discussion sponsored by Columbia University on Thursday that pregnant women have not been included in any Covid vaccine clinical trials to date. It’s not clear if the omission means that pregnant women won’t be able to receive an authorized vaccine until more safety data is collected. … “That will not necessarily be looking at efficacy, but we’ll be looking at safety and immunogenicity to bridge to the efficacy in the adult non-pregnant population,” he said at Columbia University’s Grand Rounds 2020 event.
Also covered on WCBS-TV News at 5pm

Now Is When We Choose How Effective the Covid Vaccines Will Be, THE NEW REPUBLIC, Dec 10, 2020 

That’s a message National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases head Anthony Fauci emphasized at an event on Thursday with Columbia University. “We’re going to be distributing doses within the next few weeks,” he said. “And I believe good emphasis on public health measures, together with the gradual incremental distribution of vaccines, will put us in a position where we can actually truly crush this outbreak. The only way we’re going to do it is if we do that all together, as people adhere to public health measures, and as many people as possible get vaccinated.”

How NYC Is Preparing To Roll Out COVID-19 Vaccines, GOTHAMIST, Dec 10, 2020 

Dr. Micaela Martinez, assistant professor in environmental health science at Columbia University’s public health school, said her main concern is communities of color who have been historically and currently “abused by the medical system”—examples including horrific studies like the Tuskegee trials and research on sexually transmitted diseases in which Guatemalans were purposefully infected in the 1940s.
 
Survey of Arsenic in U.S. Water Raises Environmental Justice Concerns, UPI, Dec 9, 2020 

Arsenic drinking water regulations have been standardized across the United States for more than a decade, but a new survey suggests some communities remain exposed to higher levels than others. In a new study, scientists at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health surveyed arsenic concentrations in public drinking water across the country. The results, published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, showed populations in the Southwest and Hispanic communities are exposed to arsenic levels exceeding the national maximum contaminant level.
 
Winter Presents Perfect Conditions for Virus Spread, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, Dec 5, 2020 

Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health tracked daily temperatures, humidity and Covid-19 trends in 913 U.S. counties this past summer. In unpublished preliminary findings posted online in November, they determined that Covid-19 cases were fractionally higher in northern counties than in southern counties, influenced most strongly by differences in humidity.
 
NYC Expects More Than 450K COVID-19 Vaccines This Month, GOTHAMIST, Dec 4, 2020 

Dr. Micaela Martinez, an assistant professor in environmental health science at Columbia University's public health school, said this week. “If you have a vaccine that really is reducing susceptibility, or transmissibility, those types of vaccines can be used for eradication like to drive the pathogen to extinction. But if the vaccine is just largely protecting from the severe illness, then it's a good public health measure. But it's not going to get rid of the virus itself.”
 
Social Distancing Plummeted In Lead-Up To Fall Surge, Survey Finds, NPR, Dec 2, 2020 

While Democrats remain more likely than Republicans to support new measures aimed at slowing the spread of COVID-19, a majority of U.S. adults from both political parties now agree more steps are needed to fight the pandemic, according to the latest results from a large ongoing survey. … “Overall it is encouraging to see how many people want to take this seriously,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University. “I just think that we need to have both leadership about what we're doing and how we are going to be confronting this going forward. And we need economic relief for people who are going to be really hurting from this,” Shaman says.
 
Exposure To Air Pollution Linked To Presence Of Amyloid-Beta Plaques, REUTERS Health (MD Alert), Nov 30, 2020 

There has been increasing evidence of an association between air pollution and Alzheimer’s incidence and aggravation, said Marianthi-Anna Kioumourtzoglou, an assistant professor of environmental health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. “This finding provides some more insight,” Kioumourtzoglou said.
 
Covid-19 Has Become Less Deadly, But That Could Change As Cases Rise, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov 24, 2020 

The death rate from Covid-19 is falling in the U.S., according to infectious-disease experts and biostatisticians, a signal of advancements in treatment of the disease. …  Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease modeler at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, says the current death rate could be even lower than that, at roughly 0.15%. The death rate of seasonal influenza is 0.1%, based on data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 
Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., And The Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Enter Into A Global Pharmacovigilance Agreement, YAHOO! FINANCE, Nov 24, 2020 

Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., announced an agreement with research experts from the Columbia University Irving Center Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and Mailman School of Public Health to help support the epidemiological needs of Otsuka Global Pharmacovigilance (GPV) for products, enhanced training, and employee education.
Also covered in  Global Banking and Finance Review
 
Mask Mandates Work To Slow Spread Of Coronavirus, Kansas Study Finds, NPR, Nov 23, 2020 

“You wear masks because the evidence suggests it not only protects you from acquiring the infection, but it protects others around you,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease expert at Columbia University. He says it’s been “incredibly frustrating” to see the use of masks become a partisan wedge issue instead of being seen by everyone as a sensible, public health strategy. “You do it to protect your loved ones, to protect your neighbors. You do it for the good of the country.” Shaman acknowledges that “we’re all exhausted by this virus. But the reality is the virus doesn’t care. All it looks for is the opportunity to move from person to person,” he says.
 
Number of Americans contagious with COVID-19 significantly higher than official count: study, XINHUA NEWS, Nov 20, 2020 

Over 3 million people in the United States are actively infected with COVID-19 and are potentially contagious, a figure significantly higher than the official tally, a recent study by U.S. infectious disease experts showed. A model conducted by the team of Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist from Columbia University, estimated that 3.6 million people in the country have active coronavirus infections, and are capable of passing enough virus to infect others. … "It's bad; it's really, really bad," said Shaman, an expert on infectious disease transmission and forecast, adding that the upcoming Thanksgiving Day celebrations will likely worsen the spread of the virus.
 
Immune System May Fight Off Coronavirus for Years, a New Study Suggests., THE NEW YORK TIMES, Nov 18, 2020 

Worries over how long immunity to the coronavirus persists were sparked mainly by research into those viruses causing common colds. One frequently cited study, led by Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University, suggested that immunity might fade quickly and that reinfections could occur within a year. “What we need to be very mindful of is whether or not reinfection is going to be a concern,” Dr. Shaman said. “And so seeing evidence that we have this kind of persistent, robust response, at least to these time scales, is very encouraging.” So far, at least, he noted, reinfections with the coronavirus seem to be rare.
 
More than 3 million people in U.S. estimated to be contagious with the coronavirus, THE WASHINGTON POST, Nov 18, 2020 

Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman said his team’s model estimated that 3.6 million people are infected and shedding enough virus to infect others. That’s a 34 percent week-to-week increase that followed a 36 percent increase in the previous seven-day average, he said. … Now the multiplier is surely lower — the model developed by Columbia University researchers uses 5.5. By that measure, as many as 10 million people in the United States have been infected in the past two weeks.

3 million Americans currently contagious with coronavirus: analysis, THE HILL, Nov 18, 2020 

Over 3 million people in the U.S. are estimated to be contagious with COVID-19, according to a study from Columbia University. University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman told The Washington Post his team's model estimated 3.6 million people are infected in the U.S. and shedding the virus onto others. 
 
While CDC studies coronavirus’ reinfection phenomenon, this woman has suffered 2 bad bouts, CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Nov 18, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health who has been investigating reinfections, said scientists still have a lot of questions, including: How often can reinfection happen? Are people contagious with the second infection and for how long? And if you’re reinfected, do you have less severe cases the second time or worse? To answer those questions, researchers like him have to figure out what’s behind these reinfections, Shaman said.
 
States Start Taking Significant Steps to Fight Pandemic As Cases Surge, NPR, Nov 17, 2020 

As the U.S. enters the worst stage of the coronavirus pandemic to date, more states are reimposing different kinds of mitigation measures. But with an unthinkable 1 million new cases each week and no sign of letting up, will anything short of another massive multistate lockdown be enough? Joining us now is Jeffrey Shaman is at Columbia. He says he wishes a national leader like the president would just say this. “Maybe we should be thinking about Thanksgiving on July 4 of next year. As ridiculous and painful as that sound, I'm asking people, for the sake of their loved ones, for the sake of their neighbors, for the sake of their country, to forego getting together in person.” 

Infected Again Or Endless COVID? How The ‘Reinfection Phenomenon’ Could Impact Vaccines, Herd Immunity And Human Behavior., USA TODAY, Nov 13, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, who has been investigating reinfections, said scientists still have a lot of open questions. Among other things, he said, they want to know: How often reinfection can happen, are people contagious with the second infection and for how long, and do people who are reinfected have less severe cases the second time – or are they worse off? To answer those questions, researchers like him have to figure out what's behind these reinfections, Shaman said.
 
Coronavirus Cases Are Skyrocketing. Here’s What It Will Take To Gain Control, SCIENCE NEWS, Nov 11, 2020 

To make matters worse, “the virus is going into its sweet spot at a time that we’re exhausted by it,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious diseases epidemiologist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. That sweet spot is indoors, where people are spending more time as the weather in the Northern Hemisphere turns colder — and where the virus can spread more easily.
 
These Venues Are High-Risk Areas For Spreading The Coronavirus, Model Suggests, THE WASHINGTON POST, Nov 10, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist who also has worked on models of how the virus spreads, praised the new study but cautioned that it does not answer precisely where the virus is being spread. “We can’t say, ‘This is a prescription to say you got to shut down your pizza joints and your banks as opposed to your grocery stores,’ or whatever. This paper takes us a little closer to that, but I don’t know if we’re ever going to achieve it,” Shaman said.
 
U.S. Confirmed Coronavirus Infections Hit 10 Million, NPR ONLINE, Nov 9, 2020 

More than 10 million people have now been confirmed to be infected with the coronavirus in the United States as the spread of the virus accelerates at an alarming pace across the nation. The U.S. now accounts for about one-fifth of all of the 50 million infections worldwide, more than any other nation. … “This didn't have to happen,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease expert at Columbia University.
 
YOUR HEALTH: COVID, Stress, And Your Unborn Baby, WQAD (ABC News), Nov 9, 2020 

A study published in Fertility and Sterility, and led by researchers from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Rutgers School of Public Health investigated whether stress may affect sperm and semen quality. The researchers assessed 193 men aged 38 to 49 who were required to complete a series of tests that measured levels of stress, including that from the workplace, stressful life events and overall perceived stress. 
 
The Places Hit Hardest By COVID Went Overwhelmingly For Trump, VICE, Nov 6, 2020 

The 376 counties with the worst COVID-19 outbreaks right now almost uniformly went for President Donald Trump in the 2020 election, according to an analysis by the Associated Press. … “The hard part… is the political will and cooperation issue,” Dr. Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University School of Public Health recently told Axios. “And how you message that in a divided America is hard for me to say.”

Joe Biden's uphill climb to control the coronavirus, AXIOS, Nov 4, 2020 

Aside from those more tangible solutions, experts put a big premium on communication and public messaging. … “How would [Joe] Biden be able to penetrate through that? The answer is he’s not going to be able to,” Columbia’s Jeffrey Shaman said. “So there is going to have to be, in addition, policies put in place.”
 
Virus Trails Economy As Voters’ Top Issue, According To Exit Polls, THE WASHINGTON POST, Nov 3, 2020  

The virus that has confined many Americans to their homes for much of 2020 trailed the economy as the leading issue for voters, who cast ballots in huge numbers by mail and in person, early exit polls showed Tuesday. … Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman said part of the problem is that human behavior is not easily changed. There is “huge inertia,” he said, and that will make it difficult for officials to slow outbreaks in many parts of the country.

Can the coronavirus become an endemic virus?, BBC NEWS ONLINE, October 28, 2020 

"An endemic virus is one that is part of the panorama, a disease that recurrently, regularly or continuously repeats itself in an area," explains Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health of the Columbia University, in New York. "For example, malaria is an endemic infection in sub-Saharan Africa, West Nile virus is endemic in the United States, dengue is endemic in much of Central and South America."

How Covid-19 Death-Rate Predictions Have Changed Since March, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, October 23, 2020 

Now, as many as 50 different research groups make predictions, but one of the most accurate assembles all of the individual models, calculates the median value and looks no more than four weeks into the future. … “It gives you guideposts,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease modeler at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. “Are you going in a bad or good direction? Is it under control?” 
  
How The Coronavirus Pandemic Could End, AXIOS, October 22, 2020 

It’s still the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, but history, biology and the knowledge gained from our first nine months with COVID-19 point to how the pandemic might end. … Reinfection is “the big issue,” says Columbia University’s Jeffrey Shaman, who recently described how reinfection and other factors would affect the spread of SARS-CoV-2 if it became endemic. … “We have to work with it as a virus that we will be contending with for years possibly,” Shaman says. “It doesn’t mean an effective vaccine or treatment won’t be developed. What it means is that holding out hope that we’re going to just get a vaccine and not doing anything else is not the level of preparation we need.” 
 
Experts Believe COVID-19 Is Likely To Become Endemic - Here’s What That Means,  YAHOO NEWS, October 21, 2020 

Officials at the World Health Organization warned in May that the virus may never go away. More recently, Columbia University researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti wrote a paper exploring the possibility that COVID-19 could become endemic. “Should reinfection prove commonplace, and barring a highly effective vaccine delivered to most of the world's population, SARS-CoV-2 will likely become endemic,” the authors wrote. 
 
Scientists Are Increasingly Bracing For The Possibility That COVID-19 May Never Go Away, GOTHAMIST, October 20, 2020 

Now, two scientists at Columbia University are renewing the debate just as a second wave threatens to take hold across Europe and in the Northeast United States. In an ominous sign, infection rates in New Jersey and Connecticut recently became high enough for them to qualify for New York's 14-day quarantine criteria for out-of-state travelers. In a new article published last week in the journal Science, public health researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti detail the precise circumstances in which coronavirus becomes an enduring public health problem. … “Should reinfection prove commonplace and barring a highly effective vaccine delivered to most of the world’s population, SARS-CoV-2 will likely become endemic,” the authors conclude. 
  
Chelsea Clinton’s Venture Capital Firm Ramps Up, FORTUNE, October 20, 2020 

Just three months after news broke that Chelsea Clinton was considering forming a venture capital firm, that firm is not just up and running, but also quickly gaining momentum. “Women should be at the center of their health care, especially during pregnancy,” Clinton said in a statement to Fortune about her investment in the startup. “That experience should be collaborative and holistic, and Metrodora is proud to support Oula Health to create an approach that does just that for prenatal and postpartum care.” Clinton's public health background includes earning a master's degree from and teaching at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. 
 
Air Pollution Could Increase Your Risk Of Developing Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Or Other Neurological Disorders, Study Suggests, USA TODAY, October 19, 2020 

The air you breathe each day could be harming your brain, a recent study suggests. The report, published Monday in The Lancet Planetary Health, found air pollution was significantly associated with an increased risk of hospital admissions for several neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia. … However, this is the first nationwide U.S. analysis that has linked fine pollution particles and neurodegenerative diseases, according to researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. 
 
Coronavirus In Spain Live: State Of Alarm In Madrid, Today’s News, PLEDGE TIMES, October 18, 2020 

A new article by researchers from the Mailman School of Columbia (United States) Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature that produces recurrent outbreaks in humans. Shaman is a leading authority in modeling infectious disease outbreaks such as SARS-CoV-2 and influenza. He was one of the first to recognize the importance of asymptomatic spread and the efficacy of containment measures, and published widely cited estimates of hypothetical lives saved if the confinement had occurred earlier. 
   
Covid-19 Shutdowns Reduced Unhealthy Noise Exposure, FORBES, October 15, 2020 

On average, between the first announcements of state social distancing measures and April 22, participants' sound exposure decreased by 2.6 decibels, just large enough for humans to notice. “It is getting close to a level at which we’d expect to see changes in health effects, things like hypertension or adverse mental health outcomes,” said Joan Casey, assistant professor of environmental health science at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. 
 
The U.S. was the world's best prepared nation to confront a pandemic. How did it spiral to almost..., MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, October 14, 2020 

Researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health projected that had the U.S. taken the same measures just a week earlier, almost 36,000 deaths could have been prevented. (Their model provided a range of between 28,500 and 41,700 deaths.) The research examined data on the movement of people and the spread of the virus across hundreds of counties in the U.S. “The virus grows very aggressively without intervention. It’s an exponential growth process,” said Jeffrey Shaman, one of the study’s authors and director of Columbia University’s Climate and Health Program. “The average infected person will spread it to two people.” 
 
College Football And COVID-19: A Big, Disjointed Experiment Exposes Scientific, Political Gaps, USA TODAY, October 8, 2020 

“We’ve been contending with this novel entity that’s been plunked down in our midst, and we’ve been scrambling scientifically to figure out how it works, what makes it tick, how it interacts with our immune system, how it functions epidemiologically and gets around and how we can control it,” Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman said. “This is the problem. There’s so much we don’t know about it. I could just start listing really critical questions we don’t understand yet.”  
 
President Trump’s Transfer To Walter Reed Reflects A Cautious Approach To Treating His Covid-19 Symptoms, THE WASHINGTON POST, October 3, 2020 

The severity of Trump’s illness also may depend, in part, on how he contracted the virus. Many researchers believe the virus is airborne — that it can float distances on tiny exhaled particles smaller than respiratory droplets, which are heavy enough to fall out of the air. That could lead to infection deep in the lungs and a more severe outcome, said Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman. Wearing a mask can help prevent that, research has shown. 
 
Trump’s Infection Is Part Of An Ominous National Trend As Cases Rise In Most States, THE WASHINGTON POST, October 2, 2020 

Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman, like other infectious-disease experts, expressed alarm at the complacency of many Americans and their political leaders. … Some advocates of reopening the economy have argued that herd immunity may kick in more quickly with this coronavirus, but there is no evidence of that, Shaman said. Nor is the virus becoming less deadly. “There’s no evidence that we suddenly have this wonderful get-out-of-jail-free card,” Shaman said.   
 
A ‘Herd Mentality’ Can’t Stop The COVID-19 Pandemic. Neither Can A Weak Vaccine., NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ONLINE, October 2, 2020 

“The real world violates these assumptions,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Just look at COVID-19. Young adults drive the bulk of the spread in part because they come into contact with more people. (Millennials and Gen Z are spreading coronavirus—but not because of parties and bars.) 
 
Will Coronavirus Surge In The Winter? Experts Don’t Know Yet, NBC NEWS ONLINE, October 1, 2020 

“Seasonal changes in transmission have to do with the ability of the virus to rapidly propagate through a population,” said Micaela Martinez, an infectious disease ecologist at Columbia University in New York City. … “When schools begin in the fall, we start to see cases climb and then they hit their peak in the spring and go away in the summer,” Martinez said. “We see that happen over and over.” 
 
Virus Upticks Expand Across NYC, Alarming Experts, GOTHAMIST, October 1, 2020  

“The fact that it’s in a few more neighborhoods adjacent to the other ones is not that big of a surprise,” said Dr. Jessica Justman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. “People do move around a bit.” “The question is what are things going to look like in a week or two weeks from now?” she added. … In an email, Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a public health professor at Columbia who has analyzed the human cost of delaying lockdowns, said that city officials now face a challenging ethical decision.  “Can the city close down activity in the inflicted areas without doing equivalent harm through the economic disruption?” he wrote. 
 
Huge Study Of Coronavirus Cases In India Offers Some Surprises To Scientists, THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 30, 2020 

With 1.3 billion people jostling for space, India has always been a hospitable environment for infectious diseases of every kind. And the coronavirus has proved to be no exception: The country now has more than six million cases, second only to the United States. An ambitious study of nearly 85,000 of those cases and nearly 600,000 of their contacts, published Wednesday in the journal Science, offers important insights not just for India, but for other low- and middle-income countries. … That’s not surprising because people generally tend to mix with their own age groups, Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University in New York, said: “That’s a fairly robust result.” 
 
New York City’s Uneasy Return To Indoor Dining, POLITICO NEW YORK, September 30, 2020 

“If someone is in a corner somewhere, is that area truly ventilated?” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. “None of this is going to be measured well.” Public health experts also fear New Yorkers become complacent as children return to school and restaurants reopen indoor dining, the former described by a de Blasio adviser as “hotbeds” for disease, and more people begin congregating inside as the weather cools. Shaman said he worries that New Yorkers will misconstrue hard won advances as “any return to normalcy is a return to ‘everyone is fine.’” 
 
The Coronavirus Mostly Spares Younger Children. Teens Aren’t So Lucky., THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 28, 2020 

“We know that they can get the virus,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University in New York, referring to children. “And if we know that they are able to pass it on, if we presume that they’re not complete dead ends, then they’re participating in the transmission cycle.” 
 
Five Environmental Policy Questions That Should Be Asked In The Presidential Debates, THE HILL, September 28, 2020 

Unfortunately, climate and the environment are not on the agenda for the September. 29 presidential debate. Whether they will get any air time in future debates is unknown. This would be disappointing during the best of times, but during a period of unprecedented environmental health catastrophes, this is a disservice to the American people. Andrea Baccarelli is the Leon Hess professor and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  
 
For Some Near The Cross Bronx Expressway, COVID-19 Is An Environmental Justice Issue, Too, THE CITY, September 28, 2020 

“If you’re living next to a highway, you are exposed to higher levels of air pollution,” said Markus Hilpert, associate professor in the environmental health sciences department at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and one of the authors of a recent study on truck traffic and pollution in the South Bronx. … “Where the housing is cheapest is often where the exposures are greatest,” said Diana Hernández, an associate professor of sociomedical sciences at Mailman who studies the impact poverty and place have on health. “Lower-income people can’t necessarily escape multiple forms of disadvantage,” added Hernández, one of the co-authors of the traffic study. 
 
Coronavirus Death Toll Approaches 1 Million, WBUR BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO, September 28, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University, says evidence does suggest the coronavirus transmits better in cold climates. People spend more time indoors. 
“The virus will have more opportunities to move from person to person and be more innately transmissible. That works against us,” said Shaman.  
 
COVID Cases Rising 3.3 Times Faster In Hot Spot Areas Than Rest Of NYC, GOTHAMIST, September 27, 2020 

The New York City Department of Health sounded the alarm once again about the eight ZIP codes in Brooklyn and Queens with high coronavirus positivity rates—and added four more ZIP codes where cases are starting to increase. … After reviewing the latest positivity rates for these areas, Jeffrey Shaman, a public health professor at Columbia University, said he was concerned. “Between school reopening, control fatigue, the Jewish holidays, more time spent indoors, I see more opportunities for person-to-person transmission,” he told Gothamist. 
 
Viruses Don’t Just ‘Go Away.’ The Toll Of Reaching Herd Immunity Without A COVID-19 Vaccine, HEALTHLINE, September 27, 2020 

“One of the concerns is that reinfection can be common. In terms of herd immunity, that throws a monkey wrench into the whole thing,” said Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, a professor in the department of environmental health sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York.  
  
In NYC, A ‘Most Precarious Moment’ In The COVID Timeline, NEWSER, September 26, 2020 

A study from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the city’s health department has found that New York City's lockdown from March through June, including school shutdowns and stay-at-home orders, led to a 70% decrease in the spread of the coronavirus. The research, which has yet to be peer reviewed, also found the use of face masks led to a 7% dip in transmission during the first month of their mandated use.   

Survival Mode, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, September 25, 2020 

The falloff in demand for school meals has been a national phenomenon as the pandemic rages. Researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that schools developed all kinds of innovative ways to provide nutritious meals for kids at the outset, but an estimated 1.1 billion breakfasts and lunches weren't claimed by students or their parents, and were never served. 
 
Before Classes Begin, Positive Cases Reported In 100 School Buildings., THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 24, 2020 

“What this testing shows is that the virus is there; it is going to be brought into school buildings,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University and a leading modeler of infectious diseases. “Then the question is, will it transmit there?” …Wafaa El-Sadr, a professor of epidemiology at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, said that positive cases were to be expected, given that the virus is still circulating in the city, albeit at a low level. But they underscored how reopening schools was always going to be a balancing act. 
 
Vindicated Covid-19 Models Warn Pandemic Is Far From Over, NBC NEWS ONLINE, September 24, 2020 

“In the winter, people tend to stay inside, which could make it easier to transmit the disease,” said Sen Pei, an associate research scientist at Columbia University, who has done extensive Covid-19 modeling work. “But we still don't know how the virus will perform in the winter.” Pei said that there were enormous challenges with modeling a novel coronavirus but that with nine months of data from the pandemic, his team's projections have become significantly more sophisticated. 
 
Reopening Colleges Likely Fueled Covid-19 Significantly, Study Finds, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, September 22, 2020 

The team behind the report, slated to be posted online Tuesday on the preprint server medRxiv, included professors of epidemiology, health economics and higher education. The manuscript has yet to be peer-reviewed. Sen Pei, an infectious-disease modeler and associate research scientist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, called the study “well-designed.” Dr. Pei wasn’t involved in the research. 
 
Study Finds Reopening Colleges Likely Led To Rise In New COVID Cases, FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE, September 22, 2020 

“The finding that colleges drawing students from higher-risk areas experienced a larger increase in cases is critical for planning mitigation strategies in colleges,” Sen Pei, an infectious-disease modeler and associate research scientist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said of the study. He was not one of the researchers on this study.                             
 
Fall Brings Strong Winds Of Fears Of A COVID-19 Outbreak In The Big Apple, EL DIARIO / BBC NEWS, Story in Spanish; translation by Google Translate, September 21, 2020 

“The reopening in stages implies increases in transmission activity. Each model says that increases will be seen in the cases “, he said at the Bloomberg digital newspaper Dr. Jeff Shaman of Columbia University, who is part of a team working with the City to predict possible scenarios for the outbreak. The expert explained that the Big Apple was involved in a “very difficult balancing act” between case control and the reopening of schools. But also the prevention of company bankruptcy. “The reopening is good for the city, but it is also good for the virus. There is huge potential for growth, even in a place like New York City, because 75% to 85% of the population has not yet been infected,” Shaman concluded. 
 
Access To Low Or No-Cost Meals Disrupted Due To School Closures During COVID-19, NEW-MEDICAL.NET, September 19, 2020

School closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted access to low or no-cost school breakfast and lunch programs for millions of low-income children. States and school districts developed innovative solutions to meet the nutritional needs of children and respond to the rapidly growing food insecurity crisis, yet the number of replacement meals is likely far short of what they provided prior to the pandemic, according to a study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The findings are published in the American Journal of Public Health.    
 
COVID-19 May One Day Come And Go Like The Flu, But We’re Not There Yet, POPULAR SCIENCE, September 16, 2020 

“It’s a reasonable hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2 will be seasonal, but we still need to go through another year or so of transmission in the population to really get a handle on whether that’s going to be the case,” says Micaela Elvira Martinez, an infectious disease ecologist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health who was not involved in the research. “The best we can do [is] to gather the evidence from viruses with similar transmission routes and try to puzzle-piece together what might happen for SARS-CoV-2.” 
 
In Two Phone Calls, I Learned Just Who Counts In New York, THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 15, 2020 

By early May, at least 74 Department of Education employees had died in connection with Covid. (Researchers at Columbia found that had the city shut down even a week earlier than March 16, the date when schools were finally closed, some 18,500 Covid deaths citywide could have been avoided.)  
 
New York City Prepares For A Second Wave, With A Chance To Blunt The Worst, BLOOMBERG NEWS, September 15, 2020 

For months, the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been working with academic groups at Columbia University and New York University. The academic teams have been asked to model case numbers, help predict needed hospital resources and to advise the city on how to open up workplaces, schools, restaurants and more. … “If you do these types of phased reopenings, there are going to be certain increases in transmission activity,” Columbia University’s Jeff Shaman, who is part of a team working with the city to predict the path of the outbreak. “Every model will tell you you’re going to see increases in cases.” 
 
NYC’s Spring Lockdown Cut Coronavirus Transmission 70%, Study Claims, FOX NEWS ONLINE, September 15, 2020 

New York City’s spring lockdown reduced transmission of COVID-19 by about 70%, according to a new report. In a study conducted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, scientists found that consistency with mask-wearing would have curbed the spread even further. … “Improving effective use of face coverings, especially among younger people, would significantly mitigate the risk of a resurgence in COVID-19 infections during reopening,” senior author Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia Mailman School, said in a statement. “It’s crucial that we find ways to boost consistent and correct mask use in settings where social distancing is not possible.” 
 
Washington Gridlock Could Make The Pandemic Much Worse, AXIOS, September 15, 2020 

Congress is unlikely to pass another coronavirus relief package before the election — and that's bad news not only for people who are struggling financially, but also for our efforts to contain the virus itself. … “If people need to go out and panhandle…if they’re evicted and they need to be in shelters…they're not going to be able to protect themselves, and their priority is not going to be to protect themselves from this virus,” Columbia’s Jeffrey Shaman said.  
  
The Threat Trump Chose Not To Fight, THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 13, 2020  

Jeffrey Shaman, a public health expert at Columbia University, calculated that if each county in the United States had acted just two weeks earlier to order lockdowns or other control measures, then more than 90 percent of Covid-19 deaths could have been avoided through early May. Shaman told me that his team didn’t model even earlier interventions, in January or February, but that he believes it would have been plausible for the United States to enjoy the Covid-19 mortality rate of South Korea. That would mean almost a 99 percent reduction in mortality. 
 
How Did The ‘Best-Prepared Country’ Become A Horror Story?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 12, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, a public health expert at Columbia University, calculated that if each county in the United States had acted just two weeks earlier to order lockdowns or other control measures, then more than 90 percent of Covid-19 deaths could have been avoided through early May. Shaman told me that his team didn’t model even earlier interventions, in January or February, but that he believes it would have been plausible for the United States to enjoy the Covid-19 mortality rate of South Korea. That would mean almost a 99 percent reduction in mortality. 
 
In Worst-Hit State, Cuomo Called All the Shots, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, September 12, 2020 

Even so, Columbia University researchers estimated that 17,514 deaths in the metropolitan area could have been avoided if officials had instituted seven days earlier each of the social-distancing measures they eventually enacted. “If everybody had done exactly what they did one week earlier, more than 50% fewer people would have died by the end of April,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a co-author of the study. “You could argue the horse had left the barn at that point,” said Mr. Shaman, director of Columbia University’s Climate and Health Program, who worked on Covid-19 models for New York City. 

A Landfill In Their Backyard, CNN ONLINE, September 11, 2020

Julie Herbstman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, was one of 15 advisers who provided feedback during the city’s study process. She said she wasn’t sure if the report’s results warrant further research. “I’m really very sympathetic to the situation and understand why people are concerned,” Herbstman said. “It’s just not that easy scientifically to be able to link an exposure as broad as a landfill to these cancers.”
 
What Should I Look For In A Hand Sanitizer?, ASSOCIATED PRESS, September 8, 2020

Health officials also say to avoid hand sanitizers that replace alcohol with benzalkonium chloride, which is less effective at killing certain bacteria and viruses. Making your own sanitizers isn’t encouraged either; the wrong mix of chemicals can be ineffective or cause skin burns. And you should only use hand sanitizer when you can’t wash your hands with soap and water, says Barun Mathema, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University. Hand washing is better at removing more germs.
 
John Catsimatidis Cats Roundtable, WABC RADIO, September 6, 2020

“We can reopen, but it must be slow and careful,” said Dr. Jeffery Shaman, professor at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.  
 
Experts Project Autumn Surge In Coronavirus Cases, With A Peak After Election Day, THE WASHINGTON POST, September 5, 2020

Epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University said a good target for the entire country would be to drive transmission down to 500 infections a day. At that level, contact tracing and testing could keep outbreaks under control. “The question is, is it going to spread out of control broadly?” Shaman said. “Are we going to get us down to 10,000 cases, then under 1,000, and then to my magical number of 500? The thing about this disease, it really spins out of control.”
 
Is New York’s Infection Rate Artificially Low?, GOTHAMIST, September 5, 2020

“It’s very self-selected, so it’s not a great number,” said Dr. Irwin Redlener, a professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and former director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness. “To get a real picture, you’d need a much more random sample of people – people from different areas, people from different ethnic and racial backgrounds, people with different income levels, and so on.”
 
Experts Warn U.S. Covid-19 Deaths Could More Than Double By Year’s End, THE WASHINGTON POST, September 4, 2020

“Beyond that, it’s all conjecture and guesswork because there are so many factors we just can’t predict and factors about transmission that truthfully scientists don’t understand very well yet,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious-disease expert who leads the modeling team at Columbia University. “What happens the next few months really depends on what we do as a society the next few weeks.”
 
A Global Investment in Public Health Is Vital for the Survival of Future Generations, MAVERICK CITIZEN (SOUTH AFRICA), BYLINE: WAFAA EL-SADR, September 3, 2020

The good news is that as the pandemic evolves, we are seeing a new appreciation of public health. The recently launched Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention is an important step forward. In addition, the current crisis has made evident that epidemics know no borders. An outbreak in any one region or country is a threat to all, and a strong global public health investment is our best defense. 
  
How Effective Is The Flu Vaccine?, WEBMD, September 2, 2020

lu viruses mutate quickly, and sometimes by the time the vaccine is ready, a circulating virus has changed, says Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, a professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health who leads the development of the school’s flu forecasting system. “So what actually comes out in the vaccine is not quite what they intended,” he says. 
  
How To Afford Your Medications, TEXARKANA GAZETTE, September 1, 2020

According to a study from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, in the U.S. women are 54% more likely to skip needed medications than men are. Why? Because so often health insurance is tied to employment. Women are less likely than men to have full-time jobs and they earn less, so they often cannot afford their meds. 
  
Talking Can Spread COVID-19 Even While Wearing Mask, NEWSMAX, September 1, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist and head of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York, told Live Science that the tiny aerosols, which are much smaller and lighter than respiratory droplets, “can remain aloft for a considerable amount of time.” Experts said that talking less and wearing a mask would be the fastest way to slow the transmission of the virus. 
 
A Zoom Thanksgiving? Summer Could Give Way To A Bleaker Fall, THE NEW YORK TIMES, August 31, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, a public health expert at Columbia University, thinks the virus will spread more easily as the weather forces people indoors: “But what level of a bump? That’s hard to say.” 
 
Proper Nutrition Is Needed To Defeat COVID. Rising Atmospheric CO2 Makes That Harder., THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION, CO-BYLINE: LEWIS ZISKA, August 31, 2020

Whether it is the long-spaced lines at checkout, the bare shelves, or not finding the ingredients to prepare your favorite comfort food, we have all been given a stark reminder that environmental disasters like Covid-19 can do more than disrupt our healthcare - they can also fracture our food system. Lewis H. Ziska, PhD is an associate professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. 
 
What Are The Symptoms Of Colon Cancer? Warning Signs To Never Ignore, WRCB-TV, August 31, 2020

“Rectal bleeding is something, believe it or not, people can ignore for very long periods of time,” said Dr. Alfred Neugut, a medical oncologist and cancer epidemiologist at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “It can be intermittent, so you might have it one day and then it’ll go away for a few weeks and then you’ll get it again. So in-between, you’ll think you’re OK.” But you may not be.  
 
A Zoom Thanksgiving? Summer Could Give Way To A Bleaker Fall, ASSOCIATED PRESS, August 31, 2020

Because of the many uncertainties, public health scientists say it’s easier to forecast the weather on Thanksgiving Day than to predict how the U.S. coronavirus crisis will play out this autumn… Jeffrey Shaman, a public health expert at Columbia University, thinks the virus will spread more easily as the weather forces people indoors: “But what level of a bump? That’s hard to say.” 
  
Science Over Politics- Pollen, Climate Change and Integrity With Dr. Lewis Ziska, AIRHEALTHOURHEALTH, August 31, 2020

“We have been aware of the role of pollen in terms of our allergies for some time, but what’s really happening in terms of climate change is that it is exacerbating what plants do with respect to pollen production,” said Dr. Lewis Ziska, associate professor at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. 
 
How It’s Very Unlikely For Your Child Or Grandchild To Give You Covid If They’re Under 10 But Why Teenagers Pose A Greater Risk, DAILY MAIL, August 30, 2020 

Jeffrey Shaman, expert in infectious disease at Columbia University in New York, said: ‘The question is, what happens when children get it? ‘Are they effectively dead ends? Or are they capable of communicating the virus and spreading it to other people? And I think the evidence is not conclusive.’ 
 
Tuberculosis In Eswatini, BORGEN MAGAZINE, August 30, 2020

ICAP at Columbia University has taken practical steps to establish routine testing and prevention for tuberculosis in Eswatini. ICAP worked with the MOH and the NTCP to make these practices more regular, specifically in women’s healthcare. As women come to HIV clinics, “cough-officers” screen them for tuberculosis symptoms. Part of this strategy’s effectiveness is that these clinics are now “one-stop-shops.” Women do not need to make additional visits elsewhere to be tested or treated for tuberculosis. If they test positive, treatment is readily available. If they test negative, they may take a six-month course on Tuberculosis Preventive Therapy.
  
Will Hurricane Laura’s Evacuations, Recovery Efforts Be Fertile Ground For Spread Of Coronavirus?, THE TIMES-PICAYUNE, August 29, 2020 

Taking precautions during the evacuation is an important step to minimize new infections during a hurricane response, said Sen Pei, an associate research scientist in the Department of Environmental Health Science at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. In a new paper completed earlier this month, Pei and other researchers modeled how evacuations from hurricanes could impact the spread of the virus. Their simulations showed that cases would increase as a result of evacuations, but that low infection rates in the areas evacuees ended up could minimize those impacts. 
  
Louisiana Is ‘Blind’ To Coronavirus As Hurricane Laura Shutters Testing Sites, CNBC, August 28, 2020 

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program, professor at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and co-author of a study on how hurricane evacuations could contribute to COVID-19 spread, was quoted in an CNBC article discussing how Hurricane Laura is disrupting Louisiana’s coronavirus response. Dr. Shaman said Hurricane Laura will likely “facilitate the spread” of COVID-19 and that “the pandemic provides a backdrop, upon which normal evacuation procedures have another issue to contend with. The more people that you have on the move, the more people who are displaced, the more there’s going to be this disruption and mixing of people, some of whom may have the virus. That’s going to facilitate some transmission.” 
  
‘Everything Has Changed’: How Hurricane Preparations Are Adapting To A Deadly Pandemic, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, Aug 25

In a hypothetical scenario, when evacuees fled to counties with low COVID-19 incidence, the numbers of anticipated new cases dropped to as few as 9,100. “We just used the Florida situation as an example of outcomes and what could be modeled should an actual hurricane be projected to make landfall,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental scientist at Columbia University. “We would imagine that the findings would hold in other situations.” 
 
New US Virus Cases Fall As Masks Gain Favor But Testing Lags, ASSOCIATED PRESS, Aug 25

Jeffrey Shaman, a public health expert at Columbia University, said he is skeptical enough people are immune to significantly slow the spread. But he agreed that changes in Americans’ behavior could well be making a difference, recalling the impact that people’s actions had in containing Ebola in West Africa several years ago. “Ebola stopped for reasons we didn’t anticipate at the time. It was so horrifying that people stopped touching each other,” Shaman said. Something similar may be happening with the coronavirus, he said. 
 
First Documented Coronavirus Reinfection Reported In Hong Kong, THE NEW YORK TIMES, Aug 24

“We’ve had, what, 23 million cases documented thus far, but the fact that one out of them at this point has been reinfected should not cause undue alarm as of yet,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University in New York. “However, it remains very, very concerning — and this does nothing to dispel that — that we may be subject to repeat infection with this virus,” he said.  
 
In The Brazilian Amazon, The Retreat Of The Coronavirus Sparks Questions Over Immunity, THE WASHINGTON POST, Aug 24

“In Manaus, maybe we’re done with it, and that’s it,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health scientist at Columbia University. “I would love that as well. But the reality is that it’s wishful thinking. It’s confirmation bias. We can’t pick evidence we hope is true. We have to be very careful about this because it could blow up in your face very quickly.” 
 
What We Do - and Do Not - Know About Herd Immunity, WNYC RADIO, Aug 24

The Takeaway spoke to Apoorva Mandavilli, a science reporter at the New York Times, and Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. “In the natural course of an outbreak people are being infected and there is transmission from person to person, provided that the people who have been infected, once they recover from it, develop antibodies that confer some type of protection,” said Dr. Shaman.  
 
How The Virus Spent The Convention, POLITICO, Aug 21

Cases have been slowly coming down after a July peak, but school and college reopenings and the return of normal activities like attending parties or going to restaurants is threatening that incremental progress, said Jeffrey Shaman, an professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. 
 
The MTA Is Testing A New Train Disinfecting Device - And You Probably Won't See it, SPECTRUM NY 1, Aug 21

“The air exchange is, specifically, really for the aerosols. It's for getting those out of the air, removing them in some capacity, or at least thinning out the numbers or concentration so that you’re reducing the likelihood of transmission,” added Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Columbia University. He says the devices, if they work, would provide riders with another layer of protection against pathogens in the air. “We want to use as many tools as possible in a reasonable way to protect New Yorkers as we go into the fall,” he said.   
 
Coronavirus: Some Scientists Believe Herd Immunity Is Closer Than Originally Thought, THE INDEPENDENT, Aug 18

But people at clinics are more likely to be showing symptoms and therefore more likely to be infected, said Wan Yang, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York. Random household surveys would probably find lower rates – but still well above the 21 per cent average reported for New York City, she said. 
 
Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said it wasn’t clear to him that Ms Gomes’ model offered only one possible solution. And he was suspicious of the big ranges among the four countries. “I think we’d be playing with fire if we pretended we’re done with this,” Mr Shaman said. 
 
Mild COVID-19 Cases Can Produce Strong T Cell Response, Study Says, TIMES OF INDIA, Aug 18

In some clinics, up to 80% of people tested had antibodies to the virus. The highest prevalence was found among teenage boys. But people at clinics are more likely to be showing symptoms and therefore more likely to be infected, said Wan Yang, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York.  
 
Other experts urged caution, saying these models are flawed, as all models are, and that they oversimplify conditions on the ground. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said it wasn’t clear to him that Gomes’ model offered only one possible solution. And he was suspicious of the big ranges among the four countries. “I think we’d be playing with fire if we pretended we’re done with this,” Shaman said.  
 
What If A Powerful Hurricane Hits During The Pandemic? Here's How To Prevent A Double Disaster., LIVE SCIENCE, Aug 18

A new mathematical model offers guidance on how to minimize COVID-19 spread during large-scale evacuations: People evacuating from hard-hit counties should be directed to counties with relatively lower rates of viral spread. “The major factor here is just to limit the contact of evacuees with local populations,” Sen Pei, an associate research scientist in the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York, said. “But it's challenging when you have to provide accommodation for those people.”  
  
What if ‘Herd Immunity’ Is Closer Than Scientists Thought?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, Aug 17

Is it possible that some of these communities have herd immunity? In some clinics, up to 80 percent of people tested had antibodies to the virus. The highest prevalence was found among teenage boys. But people at clinics are more likely to be showing symptoms and therefore more likely to be infected, said Wan Yang, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York. Random household surveys would probably find lower rates — but still well above the 21 percent average reported for New York City, she said. … Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said it wasn’t clear to him that Dr. Gomes’s model offered only one possible solution. And he was suspicious of the big ranges among the four countries. “I think we’d be playing with fire if we pretended, we’re done with this,” Dr. Shaman said. 
 
Epidemiologists Debunk The 14 Biggest Coronavirus Myths, BUSINESS INSIDER, Aug 17

Dr. Stephen Morse, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, appeared in a Business Insider video to discuss several coronavirus-related topics, including the effectiveness of masks, reopening schools and debunking common myths associated with the virus. “Once the schools reopen, we're going to see a situation where there are a lot of kids together and the possibility of transmission becomes much greater,” said Dr. Morse. 
 
Hurricane Evacuation + COVID = Double Disaster, Survey Says, MIAMI HERALD, Aug 14

According to a study by scientists at Columbia University and the Union of Concerned Scientists, a large-scale hurricane evacuation would increase COVID-19 cases in both the places evacuees’ fled from and the counties they fled to. “Directing evacuees to destinations with low virus activity and providing housing opportunities and resources that help maintain social distancing, encourage mask usage, and limiting opportunities for virus transmission will be essential,” said senior author Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health and the Earth Institute, and director of the university’s Climate and Health Program.  
  
Why The US Is Losing The War On COVID-19, TIME, Aug 13

“We do come together on many, many things when we have good leadership,” says Dr. David Rosner, a professor at Columbia University who specializes in the history of public health. In terms of COVID-19, perhaps more instructive than Americans’ general views on individualism are our specific beliefs regarding sickness itself. Americans have had mixed views on disease since the colonial era, Rosner says, with some viewing it as a public issue requiring collective action and others as a matter that should be left to those who get sick.  
 
COVID-19's Death Toll In New York City Was Similar To The 1918 Flu, NBC NEWS ONLINE, Aug 13

“I don't think this was surprising to anyone who worked in an emergency department or in an ICU in March, April or really in May in New York City,” Dr. Craig Spencer, an emergency room physician at Columbia University, said. “The level of death was really just unbelievable.” … He also stressed the difference between the coronavirus and the seasonal flu. “Never once in the 12 years that I've been working in emergency departments has the flu caused my ER to convert to an ICU for weeks at a time,” Spencer said. “Never once have I lost multiple of my colleagues on the front lines to the flu.” 
 
NOTABLE IN HEALTH CARE 2020, CRAIN’S NEW YORK BUSINESS, Aug 10

Scientists at academic medical centers and drug companies joined the global race to develop therapies, and some now lead the way. Nonprofits found ways to offer free Covid-19 testing, food and other critical resources to the city’s hardest-hit communities. The examples of courage, compassion, grit and ingenuity are seemingly endless. … Linda Fried, MD, Dean, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health … Craig Spencer, MD, Director, global health in emergency medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center 
  
Can We Prevent The Next 5 Million COVID Cases?, WEBMD, Aug 10

Web MD wrote about the steps that can be taken to limit the extent of the pandemic going forward. “Where we are is the worst possible place right now,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health. “Unless we develop the collective will without the leadership of the federal government to control this, we're really in for a rough ride.” 
 
Virus Refuses To Slow In Heat And Scientists Don’t Know Why, E&E NEWS, Aug 7

Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, agreed it's too early to detect climatological or any seasonal changes linked with COVID-19. “We are left with this possibility that given the endemic coronaviruses have this same seasonality as influenza, then perhaps they are similarly modulated by humidity conditions in the environment,” said Shaman. “I think it's fairly safe to say that at this point, that is not the case [for COVID-19] and that the gross lack of immunity in the population, or at least sufficient lack of immunity in the population, has allowed this virus to still transmit at this time.” 
 
“It’s Like We’re Flying Blind”: The US Has A Covid-19 Data Problem, VOX, Aug 5

“What we see over and over again in our modeling,” Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease modeler at Columbia University, explains, is that the ability to open up places like schools safely depends on “how much virus there is out there right now, how many cases you’re seeing in the last four days, and how much it’s growing at that time.” Right now we have to be really cautious, and act knowing that this data arrives already out of date. 
                                      
Younger Women In US Forgo Medications More Than Others Because Of Cost, Finds Study, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES, Aug 4

Experts at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health studied surveyed data collected from 11 different high-income nations. Their findings revealed that the largest disparities for non-adherence occurred among the younger American women compared to those of other countries. The results are published in the journal Health Affairs. “Higher rates of cost-related nonadherence among younger women, and U.S. women, in particular, may produce important sex-related disparities in health outcomes that should be further explored,” said the researchers in their paper published in the journal Health Affairs. 
 
This Carbon Emissions Law Actually Has Helped Kids Breathe, MOTHER JONES, Aug 1

“As impressive as they are, these estimated benefits for children do not take into account their potential life-long consequences, so they are likely underestimates of the true benefits of this policy,” lead author Frederica Perera, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, said in a statement. On top of that, the study does not take into account the health benefits of mitigating climate change, such as fewer heat-related illnesses.  
  
“In A Worse Place Than We Were In March” Say Experts As Cases In U.S. Hit 4.5 Million Mark, FAIR WARNING, July 31

A new study from the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health has found that a program designed to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions in the Northeast also resulted in lower rates of asthma, preterm births, and low birth weights in children, Brian Bienkowski writes for The Daily Climate.  
 
Regional Emissions Pact Has Big Health Benefits For Kids, Study Finds, WBUR RADIO, July 31

Frederica Perera, environmental scientist at Columbia University, updated a 2017 study by looking at additional health effects on developing fetuses and young children, who are especially sensitive to air pollution. “We felt it was very important to include the outcomes that were associated with the pollutants that had been largely ignored,” Perera said. “Because the long-term health benefits would be so great if we could prevent these very early damages from occurring.” 
  
Reducing Air Pollution Has Helped Children in Northeast U.S., Study Finds, ECOWATCH, July 30

“Toxic air pollutants are released right along with [carbon dioxide],” said Frederica Perera, environmental scientist at Columbia University, to the Environmental Health News. “Because of biological vulnerability, developing fetuses and young [children] are disproportionately affected by air pollution and climate change.” 
  
Climate Initiative Led To Health Benefits For 800 U.S. Children, EARTH.COM, July 29

In a new study, researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health are describing the outcome of this groundbreaking climate initiative. “As impressive as they are, these estimated benefits for children do not take into account their potential life-long consequences, so they are likely underestimates of the true benefits of this policy,” said study lead author Dr. Frederica Perera, environmental scientist at Columbia University,. “These results should spur more such initiatives to address climate change and improve the health of our children.” 
 
A Northeast Law Limited Carbon Emissions. It Also Helped Kids Breathe., GRIST, July 29

“As impressive as they are, these estimated benefits for children do not take into account their potential life-long consequences, so they are likely underestimates of the true benefits of this policy,” lead author Frederica Perera, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, said in a statement.  
 
What Went Wrong During The Northeast's First COVID-19 Spike And Is The Region Ready For Another?, USA TODAY, July 29

In early March, Dr. Jeffrey Shaman watched from his New York City home as political leaders debated how best to control the first cases of the new coronavirus. It soon led to screaming at the television. Shaman, an infectious disease expert at Columbia University, said he thought city schools should have been closed right then, in the first week of March, or at least by the second week of the month. “It was definitely too slow,” he told the USA TODAY Network. “I could not believe the schools were still open.”  
 
‘Silent Epidemic’: Nearly 1 In 3 Kids Exposed to Damaging Levels Of Lead, NPR ONLINE, July 29

Lead exposure is particularly dangerous to children under 5, whose bodies absorb lead much more efficiently than adults and are at greatest risk of suffering lifelong physical and cognitive damage, the report notes. Childhood lead exposure has also been linked to aggression, hyperactivity and other behavioral problems, notes Joseph Graziano, a professor of environmental health sciences and pharmacology at Columbia University and an expert on lead poisoning in children. “This has been a decades' long silent epidemic that has really deprived generations of children of their full capabilities and their full economic potential,” Graziano says.  
 
Northeast States Work To Learn From Missteps, NEW JERSEY HERALD, July 28

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, told the New Jersey Herald in a piece on the coronavirus response in the Northeast that “we didn’t pick up and learn quickly from seeing what was happening in China. We didn’t follow the leads of South Korea and Vietnam and Taiwan to control it, and we dithered and doubted the evidence and worried about the economic repercussions of it, which I can understand.” He added, “It’s an uncertain time and it’s difficult, but this is one of the few instances where leadership really matters.”  
  
Coronavirus Is Making Us All Socially Awkward, VOX, July 27

It’s not like the economies in those regions have suddenly shot back up with them, either. “We managed to disrupt our economy [and] skyrocket unemployment, and we didn’t control the damn virus,” said Jeff Shaman, an infectious disease modeler at Columbia University. Now, regular people are left to sift through the mess with every restaurant reservation, business decision, and party invite. The result is, essentially, anarchy. 
 
What Makes Finland The World’s Happiest Country?, RT NEWS, July 27

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at the Mailman School of Public Health, appeared on RT News to discuss the possible effects of the climate on the coronavirus, including complexities associated with forecasting the fatality rate of the virus factoring in atmospheric conditions. “[Covid-19] is highly disruptive and what is going to happen in the future strongly depends on what we as societies do, what our political leaders dictate we should do, are there shelter in place order, are they compelling mask orders, and what the general public is going to do..” said Dr. Shaman.  
 
Does N.J. Have Any Hope Of Getting Back To Normal In 2020? Here’s What Coronavirus Experts Say., NJ.COM, July 26

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at the Mailman School of Public Health, told NJ.com, in an article on returning to normal amid the pandemic, that “we're going to be dealing with the virus in a big way for the rest of this year” and he sees us “not emerging from this until summer 2021.” Dr. Shaman also said we “need to get kids back in school,” however the evidence is “still mixed” on whether children are equally or less impacted by the virus.   
 
Linda P. Fried On COVID-19 And The Public Health System, THE PERRI PELTZ SHOW, June 13

Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and professor of epidemiology, spoke on the Perri Peltz show about Covid-19. “The point is that we are in the middle of a pandemic which has basically  made visible a large set of weaknesses that we have in the United States in protecting the health of all of us… some of the situation we are in is a consequence of leadership or lack thereof and some of what we are experiencing is a consequence of decades of disinvestment in the capabilities that we could have and should have,” said Dr. Fried. 

Movie Theaters Implore Studios: Release the Blockbusters, ASSOCIATED PRESS, July 24

Some moviegoers, naturally, don’t anticipate going, regardless of what comes out. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, isn’t planning to go to the movies this year. “It seems prudent to think that indoors is where the lion share of transmission takes place,” says Shaman. “You could think well, it’s a movie theater. If you space people out, it’s a big room, tall ceilings. If they get the ventilation cranked up, it’s actually not the most concentrated environment. It’s not like a packed bar with a low ceiling. It’s probably not as dangerous as that scenario. But is it more dangerous than sitting home and watching Netflix? Yes, of course it is.” 
 
Without a Vaccine, Researchers Say, Herd Immunity May Never Be Achieved, NPR, July 24

Herd immunity holds appeal in part because it does not require radical action such as social distancing. “If the thing that is most important to you is not disrupting the economy, is not shuttering small businesses, is not causing economic instability so that people cannot eat — that is the solution you are going to glom onto,” says Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University in New York City. 
  
Harper’s Index – August 2020, HARPER’S MAGAZINE 

Estimated number of U.S. lives that could have been saved if social distancing had been implemented a week earlier: 35,287 
If social distancing had been implemented two weeks earlier: 58,322 
Source: Jeffrey Shaman, Columbia University (NYC)  
 
Movie Theaters Implore Studios: Release the Blockbusters, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 23

Some moviegoers, naturally, don’t anticipate going, regardless of what comes out. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, isn’t planning to go to the movies this year. “It seems prudent to think that indoors is where the lion's share of transmission takes place,” says Shaman. 
 
What Scientists Know About How Children Spread COVID-19, SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE, July 23

Smithsonian Magazine wrote that as communities struggle with the decision to open up schools, the research so far offers unsatisfying answers. Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said it’s impossible to get a clear picture of the effects of COVID-19 on kids right now, and that “The question is, what happens when the children get it? Are they effectively dead ends? Or are they capable of communicating the virus and spreading it to other people? And I think the evidence is not conclusive. We don't know enough to know that children to some degree are less capable of transmitting this virus.”  
 
Is Florida a Coronavirus ‘Epicenter?’ How to Interpret The Numbers Amid an Outbreak, TAMPA BAY TIMES, July 22

Experts rely on the number of infections per 10,000 residents when making comparisons across states and countries, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University. However, “those numbers can mean very different things depending on the testing capacity, so it all makes for comparisons across geographies a little challenging.”   
 
What It Will Take to Reopen Schools Safely, AMERICAN SCIENTIST, BYLINE: SANDRA ALBRECHT, MALIA JONES, APARNA KUMAR, LINDSEY LEININGER, July 21

For in-person instruction to proceed in the United States, we have to get control of the outbreak in communities first, and do infection control and planning within schools second. … It will take coordinated effort from national, state, and local leadership, individual behavior change, and funding to bring the outbreak under control and to return to in-person schooling safely.   
 
FactChecking Trump’s ‘Fox News Sunday’ Interview, FACTCHECK.ORG, July 20 

Trump claimed that other countries — later pointing to Europe — are only testing for COVID-19 if someone is “really sick,” saying the “massive” testing in the U.S. “really skews the numbers.” Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, told us in an email that “tests per confirmed case provides an indication of how aggressively a country is testing. And many countries are at much higher rates than the US.” 
 
Study on Child Transmission Raises Concern, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 19

“People, depending on their ideology on school opening, are choosing which evidence to present — and that needs to be avoided,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York. … “So long as children are not just a complete dead end — incapable of passing the virus on, which does not seem to be the case — putting them together in schools, having them mix with teachers and other students will provide additional opportunities for the virus to move from person to person,” he said. 
 
Older Children Spread The Coronavirus Just as Much as Adults, Large Study Finds, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 18

“So long as children are not just a complete dead end — incapable of passing the virus on, which does not seem to be the case — putting them together in schools, having them mix with teachers and other students will provide additional opportunities for the virus to move from person to person,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York.   
 
How Does COVID-19 Affect Kids? Science Has Answers And Gaps, ASSOCIATED PRESS, July 17

Not knowing if children are infected makes it difficult for schools to reopen safely, many experts say. Scarce data on whether infected children — including those without symptoms — easily spread the disease to others complicates the issue, said Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University infectious disease specialist.  

You’re a Senior. How Do You Calculate Coronavirus Risk Right Now?, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 17

“We have to find a balance between preserving safety and living,” said Dr. Linda Fried, a geriatrician and the dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. “We all need to do some things to maintain our mental health and well-being.” Normally, Dr. Fried pointed out, seniors would find decision-making less knotty because the C.D.C. would be providing detailed, science-based guidance for at-risk groups, updated weekly. “It’s immensely atypical, I believe unprecedented, that we’re not seeing this,” she said. Without that leadership, seniors confront a crazy quilt of changing state and local policies, and “everyone’s on their own.”
 
Biden’s Claims About Virus and His Record Go Too Far, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 13

A study by infectious disease modelers at Columbia University did find that about 36,000 deaths could have been prevented through early May had social distancing measures been enacted by March 8, rather than in mid-March. The study estimated the combined effects of all intervention practices including mask wearing, travel restrictions, business and school closings and shelter-in-place orders as “they were varyingly applied and complied with over time on a county-by-county basis,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University and a co-author of the study.
 
States That Reopened Too Quickly Amid Coronavirus Are Facing a Problem: Getting The Genie Back in The Bottle, ABC NEWS ONLINE, July 12

Jeff Shaman, a professor of environmental health science at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, said one of the biggest roadblocks in fighting the pandemic has been the lack of a consistent message from all levels of government. “What needs to be out there is a national dialogue,” Shaman told ABC News.
 
The Tricky Math of Herd Immunity for Covid-19, WIRED, July 12

Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University said that 20 percent herd immunity “is not consistent with other respiratory viruses. It’s not consistent with the flu. So why would it behave differently for one respiratory virus versus another? I don’t get that.”
 
Fact-Checking Biden on the Coronavirus and His Own Record, THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 11

A study by infectious disease modelers at Columbia University did find that about 36,000 deaths could have been prevented through early May had social distancing measures been enacted by March 8, rather than in mid-March. The study estimated the combined effects of all intervention practices including mask wearing, travel restrictions, business and school closings and shelter-in-place orders as “they were varyingly applied and complied with over time on a county-by-county basis,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University and a co-author of the study.
 
Andrew Cuomo’s Report on Controversial Nursing Home Policy for COVID Patients Prompts More Controversy, PROPUBLICA, July 10

ProPublica published an investigative piece on a report issued by the New York State Health Department defending Governor Andrew Cuomo’s policy to send COVID-19 patients from hospitals to nursing homes. Rupak Shivakoti, an epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said a fundamental flaw with the report was that while infected workers at the homes might have been a major driver of infections and death, the report deals almost not at all with whether the admissions of COVID patients added to infections and deaths.
 
With Coronavirus Science Still Iffy, U.S. Schools Hope to Reopen for 56.6 Million K-12 Students, THE WASHINGTON POST, July 9

“If we open up the schools and haven’t really figured out how to control the virus adequately, it’s not going to be that different from opening up the bars and restaurants, and the problem we’ve seen in the Sun Belt right now,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University who has studied the spread of the virus throughout the pandemic.
 
At Some U.S. Universities, a Time to Rethink Cops on Campus, LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 9

At Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, the Black and Latinx Student Caucus pair their demands for more Black faculty members and a “racial awareness and inclusion curriculum” with calls for financial aid for Black prospective students from the surrounding Washington Heights and Harlem neighborhoods. Activists also oppose policing these areas in the name of “student safety,” asking that funds instead be utilized to provide mental health and transportation services for students and the community.
 
Why the Black Lives Matter Protests Didn’t Contribute to the COVID-19 Surge, HEALTHLINE, July 8

Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, director of Columbia University’s climate and health program, has been leading modeling projects over the past several months to project how the virus is likely to spread. “If we saw a moderate-sized reduction in transmissibility, we still would have seen a small spike,” Sharman told Healthline. “But we didn’t see that.”
 
How The White House Can Build Public Trust And End The Coronavirus Crisis, POLITICO, July 7

Going forward, the government needs to do a better job of managing expectations, said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease researcher at the Columbia University School of Public Health. The coronavirus was unknown to science until December, and our understanding of it is changing as time passes and more people are infected. … “This is where leadership and messaging are so important,” Shaman said. “People have to understand it’s not like you can spend a month wearing masks and then it’s done. We don’t have our Get Out of Jail Free card yet.”
 
Convention Jitters Grip Democrats, POLITICO, July 7

Politico reported that Democrats are now questioning whether gathering in small events across the country as an alternative to the Democratic National Convention is a plausible option after a new surge of COVID-19 cases. DNC officials said any choices will be made in consultation with two epidemiologists, Ian Lipkin of Columbia University and Larry Brilliant.
 
The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer, CNN, July 6

“We need to manage people's expectations to understand that we're going to be dealing with this virus for some time and that we have to wear face masks and enact social distancing and wash our hands and restrict our activities because it's just not about protecting ourselves. It's about protecting each other,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University.
 
‘Almost Like a Social Pandemic’: As States Pause Reopenings, Experts Warn of More Confusion, Isolation, Agitation, USA TODAY, July 6

“The U.S. has not invested in a lot of the social protections that leave people feeling like they have a safety net,” Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and professor of epidemiology, told USA TODAY. “And without a safety net and without a social infrastructure of connectedness and cohesion of communities, which we’ve lost a lot of, it exacerbates the sense of anxiety and fear and isolation that people have in these circumstances. It makes it all a lot worse.”
 
Counting The Lives Saved by Lockdowns—And Lost to Slow Action, THE SCIENTIST, July 6

“It’s not just about looking retrospectively,” Jeffrey Shaman, a data scientist at Columbia University and coauthor of the preprint on US deaths, tells The Scientist. “All the places that have managed to get it under control to a certain extent are still at risk of having a rebound and a flare up. And if they don’t respond to it because they can’t motivate the political and public will to actually reinstitute control measures, then we’re going to repeat the same mistakes.”
 
How Scientists Know COVID-19 is Way Deadlier Than The Flu, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ONLINE, July 2

Using a statistical model, epidemiologists at Columbia University estimated the infection-fatality rate for New York City based on its massive outbreak from March 1 to May 16. Their results, published online as a non-peer reviewed preprint on June 29, show that the coronavirus may be even deadlier than first thought. According to their data, the COVID-19 infection-fatality rate is 1.46 percent, or twice as high as earlier estimates (and much higher than a misinformed rate being widely shared on social media). This risk varies by age, with those older than 75 having the highest infection-fatality rate, at 13.83 percent.
 
Are We Really 'All In This Together'? Coronavirus Taking An Unequal Toll On Minorities, ABC NEWS ONLINE, July 1

It's a concern backed up by data, as a white paper from Harvard has found that Black and Latino Americans with COVID-19 not only die more often -- but also die more prematurely compared to the white population. This recent review echoes data from the Centers for Disease Control showing the death rates among Black and Latino Americans far outweigh those of their white counterparts. … Columbia University public health researchers who assessed New York City subway swipe data by neighborhood before and after the pandemic struck told ABC News the evidence shows that low-income minority populations are more reliant on public transportation.
 
Readers' Forum, July 1, 2020: Proven benefits of mask-wearing, TRIBUNE STAR, July 1

Most of the 172 studies examined face mask use in health care and not community settings ... and many of the studies were observational, which is not the gold standard of science. However, a randomized controlled trial would be “very unethical in a pandemic,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. Still, he says the fact that there is a benefit from masks is clear, the value of a meta-analysis.
 
Southwestern Correctional Facilities & Arsenic in Drinking Water, WQP MAGAZINE, July 1

This is the first nationwide analysis of drinking water in U.S. correctional facilities, according to Phys.org. The study was conducted by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers Anne Nigra, Ph.D., and Ana Navas-Acien, MD, Ph.D., professor of environmental health sciences. "Mass incarceration is a public health crisis,” said Anne Nigra. “People who are incarcerated have a right to safe drinking water. Correctional facilities with their own water systems need to reduce water arsenic concentrations as much as possible, even below current regulatory standards.”
 
Study Identifies Abnormal Surge of Flu-like Illnesses in March, THE SCIENTIST, June 30

Columbia University epidemiologist Jeffrey Shaman finds the team’s estimates of true infections too high. If there were 8.7 million actual cases when only 120,000 were recorded, then only one in 72 cases was being reported in March, he says. “We get something more like one in twelve, which is one-sixth of that, which would suggest 1.5 million infections at that time,” he adds, referring to his own models.
 
The Tricky Math of Herd Immunity for COVID-19, QUANTA MAGAZINE, June 30

Other epidemiologists are also skeptical of the low numbers. Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University said that 20% herd immunity “is not consistent with other respiratory viruses. It’s not consistent with the flu. So why would it behave differently for one respiratory virus versus another? I don’t get that.”
 
How the World Missed COVID-19's Silent Spread, BALTIMORE SUN, June 29 

While public health officials hesitated, some doctors acted. At a conference in Seattle in mid-February, Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor, said his research suggested that COVID-19′s rapid spread could only be explained if there were infectious patients with unremarkable symptoms or no symptoms at all. In the audience that day was Steven Chu, the Nobel-winning physicist and former U.S. energy secretary.“If left to its own devices, this disease will spread through the whole population,” he remembers Shaman warning.
 
How the World Missed Covid's Symptom-Free Carriers, THE NEW YORK TIMES, June 28

While public health officials hesitated, some doctors acted. At a conference in Seattle in mid-February, Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University professor, said his research suggested that Covid-19's rapid spread could only be explained if there were infectious patients with unremarkable symptoms or no symptoms at all.
 
The ‘Katrina To COVID Class’: How the Coronavirus Era Affects New Orleans Students More Acutely, HUFF POST, June 27

Because of this widespread displacement, few members of the city’s Class of 2020 started kindergarten in New Orleans itself. Many Katrina-evacuee families stayed on the move for several years, seeking better work and housing. High numbers of evacuee children fell behind in school and suffered unaddressed mental-health concerns, according to a study from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.
 
Asymptomatic Vs Presymptomatic COVID-19: What’s the Difference?, FORBES, June 27

According to a study led by epidemiologists at Columbia University, which put real data into a computer model to estimate the proportion of undocumented cases that escaped China before lockdown, around 86% of Coronavirus cases weren’t detected. Though the message behind what 'asymptomatic' means is confused, it’s clearly crucial to understanding how COVID-19 continues to spread.
 
Here's How to Stop the Virus From Winning, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, June 26 

“The countries that have succeeded have been the ones that have had real political and public will unite,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, whose lab is modeling hospital burden during the crisis. None of these experts believe the COVID-19 war is lost, but government leaders, news media, scientists, and the general public need to shift their mindsets and messaging, because if the virus is victorious, the devastation will be several times worse than what we’re seeing now.
 

How The Virus Won, THE NEW YORK TIMES, June 26

Estimates of the number of contagious people who left New York and Seattle are from modeling by Sen Pei and Jeffrey Shaman at Columbia University. Estimates of the number of deaths that could have been avoided with earlier social distancing are from Dr. Pei, et al. Red dots show proportion of contagious travelers, based on estimates from Jeffrey Shaman, Columbia University. More than 22,000 deaths in the New York City area could have been avoided if the country had started social distancing just one week earlier, Columbia University researchers Dr. Shaman and Sen Pei estimate.
 
The School Reopeners Think America Is Forgetting About Kids, THE ATLANTIC, June 25

A major reason schools are reluctant to reopen isn’t just the potential danger to children, but also that to the teachers and parents whom students might infect. … However, Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, believes that opening up schools and daycares would be risky, pointing to other studies suggesting that kids might indeed serve as vectors, passing the virus onto others in their family as they do with stomach bugs and sniffles. “I haven’t seen enough evidence to convince me that children are less involved in the transmission of COVID-19,” Shaman told me in an email.
 
Heat and Lockdowns: Double Trouble for Home Alone Older Adults, CGTN, June 25

"We're expecting to see more frequent and more extreme events," said Jeffery Shaman, director, Climate and Health Program at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "That's certainly what we've witnessed over the past 30 years. So it is going to be a big problem, and it's something where we're not necessarily yet fully equipped," he added.
 
A Virus Study You’ve Never Heard of Helped Us Understand COVID19, THE SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE, June 25

Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health wanted to fill in the rest with a radical kind of study, one that tested and tracked seemingly healthy people to see who was unknowingly spreading disease. Beginning in March 2016, Shaman and his team at Columbia began the Virome of Manhattan, an ambitious project to build that picture of respiratory viral infections throughout the borough. “There's a large percentage of infections that are undocumented," Shaman adds. "They are contagious. Not as contagious as the confirmed cases. But because there's so many more of them, they're the ones who are setting up these silent chains of transmission, which we're unaware of until somebody gets sick enough that they go to see a doctor."
 
Zirpoli: The power of the mask, BALTIMORE SUN, June 24

A recent review of 172 studies published in The Lancet, the British medical journal, on June 1 found that the power of the mask is significant in reducing the spread of viruses, including COVID-19. As a result of these studies, Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University stated that “face masks are a key component of the non-pharmaceutical arsenal we have to combat COVID-19.”
 
As Coronavirus Slows, New York City Health Officials Watch Hot Spots, WALL STREET JOURNAL, June 23

“You’re not going to hit some magical number and some isolated community is going to be done with it because they’ve gone through enough already,” said Jeffrey Shaman of the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. “You’re going to see a slowing, but it doesn’t mean elimination.”
 
Yes, Wearing Masks Helps. Here's Why, NPR, June 21

Now, most of the studies in the analysis looked at face mask use in health care, not community, settings. And they were observational, not the gold standard of science, a randomized controlled trial, which would be "very unethical in a pandemic," says Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. Still, he says the fact that there is a benefit from masks is clear. "I personally think that face masks are a key component of the non-pharmaceutical arsenal we have to combat COVID-19," says Shaman.
 
High Stakes for Parents and Schools, AXIOS, June 21

We don’t know how risky reopening schools is because we don’t have much data on how likely kids are to get infected or to transmit the virus. So many experts want to keep schools, camps and other kids' programs closed out of an abundance of caution. “If you put people together in a mixed environment, if you have essentially a daily mass gathering of children with teachers, you’re providing opportunities for transmission of the virus,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at Columbia University.

If the Virus Slows This Summer, It May Be Time to Worry, WIRED, June 18

It would be wise to take advantage of the summertime to “crush this virus as close to out-of-existence as possible,” says Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease forecaster at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health. “That way when it comes into the wintertime and it’s more transmissible you’re starting for a lower setpoint.” The U.S. is far from achieving this, he adds: “We’re not crushing it at all.”

A Growing Body Of Research Highlights The Importance Of Wearing Face Masks, NPR, June 17

A lot of people are asking the question we are about to tackle in this next story - is all this mask-wearing really helping to curb the spread of coronavirus? Jeffrey Shaman is a researcher and epidemiologist at Columbia University. It's very powerful as a tool to control the virus [and] I personally think that face masks are a key component of the non-pharmaceutical arsenal we have to combat COVID-19.” 

Risk for COVID-19 Reinfection Remains Unknown, HEALTH DAY, June 17 

The potential risk for reinfection with COVID-19 remains a concern, but evidence is scarce, according to Jeffrey Shaman, director of the climate and health program at Columbia University, who recently spoke with HD Live! about his research and the risk for reinfection with COVID-19. "We'd love to think that we're basically 'one and done' with this virus, so that you're infected with the virus, you develop antibodies, and the next time you encounter the virus, it takes it and removes it from your body and preemptively clears it so you're not infected," said Shaman. "The reality is we still don't know as of yet."

It Doesn’t Look Like the Protests Are Causing a COVID-19 Spike, SLATE, June 17

Jeffrey Shaman, director of the climate and health program at Columbia University and the author of widely publicized studies on the spread of COVID-19, said, “I think, personally, that the lion’s share of infection occurs indoors. I think that outdoors, in sunshine, with masks, is a fairly safe environment.” Shaman said that he and his team at Columbia modeled the demonstrations as they were occurring, to see whether they could lead to a surge in COVID-19 infections...Shaman, who advises New York officials on health matters, thinks most purely outdoor events, even large, fairly dense ones, could be held—as long as people wear masks and as long as the people themselves were not in categories of high risk, such as old age or underlying health conditions.

Children are only half as likely to get infected with the coronavirus, study finds, WASHINGTON POST, June 16

Children and teenagers are only half as likely to get infected with the coronavirus as adults age 20 and older, and they usually don’t develop clinical symptoms of covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, according to a study published Tuesday. … “While the evidence is mixed, children clearly have some role and can be infected. I think that opening schools and daycare facilities is very risky,” Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, said. 

What Colorado is getting right about reopening, POLITICO, June 16

Cases were increasing in Arizona and decreasing in Colorado. The rate of virus transmission was lower in Colorado in late April than it was in Arizona and Utah, giving Polis and his health officials a little more margin for error. “You want to be at a very strong starting place,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at the Columbia University School of Public Health. “You want some wiggle room.”

Spate of New Research Supports Wearing Masks to Control Coronavirus Spread, WASHINGTON POST, June 13

“Anecdotally, it appears that face-mask use is an important control against multiple modes of SARS-CoV-2 transmission,” including droplets and aerosols, said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. He highlighted Asian countries such as South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam that had high rates of face-mask use early in the pandemic. They “have had better success squashing the virus and keeping their economies going,” Shaman said.

Did Protests Fuel COVID-19 Cases? Are We Already in a Second Wave? Your Coronavirus Questions, Answered, USA TODAY, June 13

However, experts say there’s more than one reason certain states are experiencing a surge in cases. Georgia was one of the first states to reopen in April without meeting guidelines and its curve has stayed relatively flat, said Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Hollywood is Reopening with Detailed New Rules for Productions Amid COVID-19, LOS ANGELES TIMES, June 12

The testing recommendations are based on models provided by Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health scientist at Columbia University. Increased testing frequency reduces the risk of acquiring infection, according to the report: Should someone with COVID-19 come to the set, weekly testing for the cast and crew will greatly reduce the risk of additional cases. Testing every three days, which will be required in Zone A areas, reduces the risk further; daily testing largely eliminates it, the report says.

“Totally Predictable”: State Reopenings Have Backfired, June 12

Many states opened up in early May, hoping the economy would recover while a winning battle against Covid-19 continued apace. Unfortunately, it’s now clear that in the areas where the virus has come roaring back, few gains against it were made in the last month. “We managed to disrupt our economy [and] skyrocket unemployment, and we didn’t control the damn virus,” said Jeff Shaman, an infectious disease modeler at Columbia University.
 
Florida, South Carolina coronavirus figures are the states' highest yet for a single day, FOX NEWS, June 12

"It seems that we, the U.S., has given up and accepted this disease as a facet of life," Jeffrey Shaman of the Columbia University School of Public Health told NPR. "It didn't have to be this way, and it still doesn't going forward."
 
U.S. Hits 2 Million Coronavirus Cases As Many States See A Surge Of Patients, NPR, June 10

"It seems that we, the U.S., has given up and accepted this disease as a facet of life," says Jeffrey Shaman of the Columbia University School of Public Health. "It didn't have to be this way, and it still doesn't going forward."
Also covered by The Weather Channel and Miami Herald
 
A Delicate Balance: Weighing Protest Against the Risks of the Coronavirus, THE NEW YORK TIMES June 7

“You cannot pin this on the protests,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, whose projections of the virus’s path suggest that U.S. coronavirus deaths will increase in the coming weeks. “The protests are not in and of themselves going to drive the resurgence in cases. This is associated with all the new opportunities that are providing a way for people to get together and pass the virus to one another.”
 
How specific were Biden’s recommendations on the coronavirus?, THE WASHINGTON POST, June 4

“Right now there is a study out at Columbia University and their disease control center up there. They pointed out that if he had listened to me and others and acted just one week earlier to deal with this virus, there’d be 36,000 fewer people dead.” In various venues, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee has cited a preliminary Columbia University study that estimated that tens of thousands fewer people would have died of covid-19 if social-distancing measures had been put in place earlier than mid-March. Specifically, the study estimated that orders in effect March 8 would have resulted in nearly 36,000 fewer deaths (through May 3), and orders as soon as March 1 would have resulted in nearly 54,000 fewer deaths.
 
Coronavirus and the Flu: A Looming Double Threat, SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, June 4

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, says if SARS-CoV-2 follows seasonal patterns like some other coronaviruses and influenza viruses do, it could subside in the summer. “But that could come back to haunt us,” he adds. “We might get complacent; we might not be prepared.” Four flu virus pandemics over the past 100 years—H1N1 in 1918, H2N2 in 1957, H3N2 in 1968 and H1N1 in 2009—had a deadly second wave around the fall and early winter. COVID-19 could do the same. “The concern that we might have a double whammy of flu and coronavirus is legitimate,” Shaman says.
 
We Can't Combat the COVID-19 Pandemic Without Public Health Investment, THE HILL,
OPINION: Linda P. Fried, June 3

As we deal with the worst outbreak of a viral disease to hit America’s shores in at least a century, the CDC — indeed, the entire public health infrastructure in this nation — is a shadow of its former self, lacking the infrastructure or the resources to coordinate a national response to this pandemic effectively…We desperately need to use this moment to restore America’s public health infrastructure to its former greatness, not to vilify our public health leaders and institutions”
Linda P. Fried, M.D., is the dean and DeLamar professor of Public Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
Also referenced in Kaiser Health News
 
Experts Consult Models to Predict if Coronavirus cases will spike, NEWSDAY, June 1

“The dominant source of uncertainty is we don’t know what people are going to do and the decisions that are going to be made even a few weeks out” that could encourage or limit mobility, said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist and modeler at Columbia University. “The models are going to be imperfect … Those uncertainties are enormous and they swamp it.”
 
AMPTP, SAG-AFTRA, DGA Weigh In On Industry White Paper Protocols For Safe Return To Work, AMPTP, SAG-AFTRA, June 1

The Committee assembled a coalition of world-renowned epidemiologists and infectious disease experts to help in the development of a plan. They include:
• W. Ian Lipkin, MD, John Snow Professor of Epidemiology and Director for the Center of Infection and Immunity at the Mailman School of Health, Professor of Pathology and Neurology at the Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University;
• Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, Professor of Environmental Health Sciences in the International Research Institute for Climate and Society/Earth Institute at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Health – who modeled various testing protocols for the Committee.
 
Why New York Suffered When Other Cities Were Spared by COVID-19, STARS AND STRIPES, May 31

"There's blame to go all around," said Jeffrey Shaman, director of the climate and health program at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "We haven't been confronted with an infectious-disease threat like this for 100 years."
"In a place that doesn't have a car culture, that relies on mass transit, there are more opportunities for it to get into households and move around," said Columbia's Shaman.
 
Researchers Unsure About COVID-19 Reinfection, UPI, May 30

"We'd love to think we're basically one-and-done with this virus, so that if you're infected with the virus, you develop antibodies and the next time you encounter the virus it takes it and it removes it from your body," Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Columbia University Climate and Public Health Program, said during a HealthDay Live! interview. … "We've seen this over and over again, where people who we really thought were cleared and had tested negative are testing positive subsequently," Shaman said. "We haven't found really definitive evidence it is a repeat infection for these individuals."
 
New York Drives Back Coronavirus’s Deadly March, WALL STREET JOURNAL, May 29

The reason the daily death toll has gone down "is completely because of the reduction in transmissions due to social-distancing measures," said Micaela Elvira Martinez, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "We can mathematically calculate it, essentially for every place in the United States."
 
Is COVID-19 'One and Done?' Experts Ponder Odds for Reinfection, HEALTH DAY NEWS, May 29

"We'd love to think we're basically one-and-done with this virus, so that if you're infected with the virus, you develop antibodies and the next time you encounter the virus it takes it and it removes it from your body," Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Columbia University Climate and Public Health Program, said during a HealthDay Live! interview.

Is COVID-19 'One and Done?' Experts Ponder Odds for Reinfection, U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, May 29

We'd love to think we're basically one-and-done with this virus, so that if you're infected with the virus, you develop antibodies and the next time you encounter the virus it takes it and it removes it from your body," Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Columbia University Climate and Public Health Program, said during a HealthDay Live! interview. … Scattered studies have found the presence of COVID-19 in the bloodstream of people who appeared to have recovered, Shaman said. But it's not clear whether this is an actual reinfection or something else. "We've seen this over and over again, where people who we really thought were cleared and had tested negative are testing positive subsequently," Shaman said. "We haven't found really definitive evidence it is a repeat infection for these individuals."
 
Trump marks 'very sad milestone' of 100K coronavirus deaths, THE HILL, May 29

A study by Columbia University released last week found that the U.S. could have prevented roughly 36,000 deaths from the coronavirus through early May if social distancing and stay-at-home orders had been implemented earlier. 
 
Why New York Suffered When Other Cities Were Spared by Covid-19, BLOOMBERG, May 28

“There’s blame to go all around,” said Jeffrey Shaman, director of the climate and health program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “We haven’t been confronted with an infectious-disease threat like this for 100 years.”
Also covered in POLITICO
 
Researchers Ponder Why COVID Appears More Deadly in the U.S. and Europe than in Asia, THE WASHINGTON POST, May 28

“We are all facing the same bug with the same general arsenal of immune responses,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. “There are differences in testing, reporting, control from country to country. And there are differences in rates of hypertension, chronic lung disease, et cetera, on a country-by-country basis.”
 
For Seniors, COVID-19 Sets Off A Pandemic Of Despair, KAISER HEALTH NEWS, May 28

“[Older adults] are wondering if their lives are going to end shortly for reasons out of their control,” said Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, in a university publication. “They’re wondering if they’ll be able to get the care they need. And most profoundly, they’re wondering if they are going to be cast out of society. If their lives have value.” 
 
The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer, CNN, May 27

“Unfortunately this is a new entity, a new virus that has dropped in our mists and we are still scrambling to fully understand it. We don't understand the epidemiological characteristics of it. We don't know if the virus is seasonal in that it will be less transmissible in July and August, and then be more transmissible come wintertime. These are things that have important ramifications in how we control the virus on a patient by patient level, how we treat people, and how we prepare for it as a society and in our public health interventions.” Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

'We All Feel at Risk': 100,000 People Dead From COVID-19 In The U.S., NPR ONLINE, May 27

A study done this month by a Columbia University research team suggests the number of coronavirus deaths in the U.S. could have been considerably lower had Americans been told sooner to stay home and maintain social distancing. … Columbia University's [Jeffrey] Shaman said the U.S. has to keep suppressing the spread of COVID-19 while having an acceptable level of a functioning economy. "That's the hard problem we're trying to address as we try to figure that out and we loosen restrictions," Shaman said.
 
'Tell Me What To Do! Please!': Even Experts Struggle With Coronavirus Unknowns, THE WASHINGTON POST, May 26

Jeffrey Shaman, an influential epidemiologist at Columbia University, said that the health of the economy matters, and that the nation needs to restore economic activity in a way that keeps people safe. “We have to do both those things,” Shaman said. “We want a functioning economy, and we don’t want people getting sick.”
 
Distress in Seniors Surges Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, CNN, May 25

"[Older adults] are wondering if their lives are going to end shortly for reasons out of their control," said Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, in a university publication. "They're wondering if they'll be able to get the care they need. And most profoundly, they're wondering if they are going to be cast out of society. If their lives have value."
 
On Weekend Dedicated to War Dead, Trump Tweets Insults, Promotes Baseless Claims and Plays Golf, THE WASHINGTON POST, May 25

In a Sinclair Broadcasting interview, Trump politicized a study from Columbia University indicating that had stringent social distancing been in place a week earlier, the United States could have prevented 36,000 coronavirus deaths through early May — about 40 percent of fatalities reported to date. “Columbia University is a liberal, disgraceful institution, to write that,” Trump said in the interview broadcast Sunday. “I saw that report from Columbia University and it is a disgrace that they would play right to their little group of people to tell them what to do.”
Also covered in New York Daily News
 
Can You Catch the Coronavirus From Handling Cash? Here's What Experts Say, TECH TIMES, May 25

Some experts say it's better safe than sorry. Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, told CBS News that droplets could live on surfaces, including dollar bills. "It seems like it could be a path for transmission because it's something people commonly share and handle," he said.
 
Trump Lashes Out Amid Pandemic at Medical Research That's Discordant with His Views, MARKET WATCH, May 23

Trump offered similar pushback Thursday to a new study from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. It found that more than 61% of COVID-19 infections and 55% of reported deaths — nearly 36,000 people — could have been prevented had social distancing measures been put in place one week sooner. Trump has repeatedly defended his administration’s handling of the virus in the face of persistent criticism that he acted too slowly.
 
Science Friday, WNYC, May 22

“It’s very important to be aware of how much more affected children, everyone in low income communities, and communities of color have been,” says Frederica Perera, founding director of the Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “They have suffered disproportionate exposure to air pollution and they’ve more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change as well.”

Trump Lashes Out At Scientists Whose Findings Contradict Him, ASSOCIATED PRESS, May 22

(Trump) offered similar pushback Thursday to a new study from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. It found that more than 61% of COVID-19 infections and 55% of reported deaths — nearly 36,000 people — could have been been prevented had social distancing measures been put in place one week sooner. Trump has repeatedly defended his administration's handling of the virus in the face of persistent criticism that he acted too slowly. ”Columbia's an institution that’s very liberal," Trump told reporters Thursday. "I think it’s just a political hit job, you want to know the truth.”
Also covered by ABC NEWS 

Trump calls study on taking earlier action against coronavirus a 'political hit job', THE HILL, May 21

President Trump on Thursday dismissed as a "political hit job" a Columbia University study that showed thousands of lives lost to the coronavirus could have been saved with earlier social distancing measures. The president defended his actions to combat the pandemic after The New York Times published findings from the university's disease modelers that roughly 36,000 fewer people in the U.S. would have died from COVID-19 if the country imposed restrictions just one week earlier.
"I was so early. I was earlier than anybody thought… "Columbia is an institution that's very liberal," he added. "I think it's just a political hit job, you want to know the truth." The university study found that by early May about 54,000 fewer people would have died from the virus had those policies been put in place on March 1.

Study finds earlier coronavirus restrictions in US could have saved 36,000 lives. Trump calls it 'political hit job.', ABC NEWS, May 21

Columbia University researchers point to critical decisions made in March. After researchers at Columbia University this week estimated about 36,000 lives in the United States could have been saved from the novel coronavirus had social distancing and other restrictions been put in place a week earlier in March, the White House on Thursday pointed a finger at China, and the president called it a "political hit job."

Earlier coronavirus lockdown 'could have saved 36,000 lives', BBC NEWS, May 21

A study has estimated there may have been 36,000 fewer coronavirus-related deaths had the US entered lockdown a week earlier in March. The Columbia University research also estimated that around 83% of deaths could have been avoided if measures had been taken two weeks earlier. It suggested that 54,000 fewer people would have died had cities begun locking down on 1 March. President Trump dismissed the report as a "political hit job".

The Lead With Jake Tapper, CNN, May 21

Researchers at Columbia University estimated about 36,000 lives in the United States could have been saved from the novel coronavirus had social distancing and other restrictions been put in place a week earlier in March. President Trump dismissed the report as a "political hit job".

Cuomo, de Blasio blame ignorance, but not themselves, in wake of damning report, POLITICO, May 21

An analysis by Columbia University released Wednesday night concluded that if New York acted even one week earlier in ordering people to stay home and mandating social distancing, it would have spared more than 17,000 lives in the New York metro area. The study evaluated how the entire country would have fared had it taken faster action and determined that roughly 36,000 fewer people would have died from the fast-spreading virus had people been forced to keep their distance from one another one week earlier in March.
 
Study finds early intervention key to blocking coronavirus spread, Rachel Maddow Show, MSNBC (VIDEO), May 21

Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University School of Public Health, talks with Rachel Maddow about how the doubling nature of the spread of coronavirus makes it crucially important to act quickly in the early stages of an outbreak before cases balloon.

New COVID-19 Models Shows Why Early Action Matters, PBS NEWS HOUR, May 21

A newly released analysis of coronavirus' spread in the U.S. suggests a haunting hypothetical: that if social distancing and stay-at-home orders had been implemented only a week earlier, more than 30,000 lives might have been saved. If you take a look at using as a template South Korea, where they instituted early action, they did widespread testing, contact tracing, and the numbers have diminished dramatically — as a matter of fact, they're getting back to work. Professor Jeffrey Shaman is the lead author. He's at Columbia University. He elaborated on that a little bit further.

Social distancing a week earlier could've saved thousands: study, WPIX, May 21

A study by Columbia University suggests tens of thousands of lives could have been saved if we began social distancing earlier. "Our estimates are that a majority of deaths would have been prevented, just over 50% of them would have been reduced if we had acted just a week earlier," said researcher and epidemiologist Dr. Jeffrey Shaman. He determined that not only would this have prevented death, there would have been at least 700,000 fewer infections had Americans been told to socially distance on March 8…"This study shows the power of physical distancing," said Dr. Shaman. 

Social Distancing a Week Earlier Could Have Saved 36,000 American Lives, Study Says, THE WASHINGTON POST, May 21

New research from Columbia University epidemiologists offered one possible answer. If the same kind of social distancing had been in place seven days earlier, their study found, the United States could have prevented 36,000 deaths through early May — about 40 percent of fatalities reported to date. “If you don’t take steps to fight the growth rate aggressively, you get much worse consequences,” Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health sciences professor who led the study, told The Washington Post. His team’s analysis used infectious disease modeling to examine the spread of the virus from March 15, when many people nationwide began staying home, until May 3. Then, Shaman and other researchers modeled another scenario: What if government officials had closed everything down one week earlier?

HD Live! Preview: How Big Is the Risk of COVID-19 Reinfection After Recovery?, HEALTH DAY, May 21

New research from Columbia University says that reinfections with coronaviruses are not uncommon, and they could even happen within a year of prior infection. Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, Director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University, is one of the world's experts in modeling the spread of infectious disease. He is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Watch a preview above, and see the full interview here on Friday, May 22, at 4:30 p.m. ET.

Lockdown Delays Cost at Least 36,000 Lives, Data Show, THE NEW YORK TIMES, May 20 

“It’s a big, big difference. That small moment in time, catching it in that growth phase, is incredibly critical in reducing the number of deaths,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia and the leader of the research team. The findings are based on infectious disease modeling that gauges how reduced contact between people starting in mid-March slowed transmission of the virus. Dr. Shaman’s team modeled what would have happened if those same changes had taken place one or two weeks earlier and estimated the spread of infections and deaths until May 3. The results show that as states reopen, outbreaks can easily get out of control unless officials closely monitor infections and immediately clamp down on new flare-ups. And they show that each day that officials waited to impose restrictions in early March came at a great cost.

What Happens to the Coronavirus When it gets Warmer?, BBC News, May 20

The bottom line is whatever effect the summer will have on the coronavirus, it is still going to be able to spread “given the high level of susceptibility in the broader population for the virus to get around and move from person to person,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. "It’s hard to say too much about the coronavirus because we only have months’ worth of data, unlike other viruses for which there are years of data. And whatever available data there is could vary by reporting requirements and standards in different countries: not all places document and report infections at the same level of detail. All of this makes it a bit challenging to actually unlock this by looking at case data or death data or hospitalization data,” Shaman said.

Where Chronic Health Conditions and Coronavirus Could Collide, THE NEW YORK TIMES, May 18

“Places that have not seen a lot of infection yet should be thinking about what infection is going to mean once they have an outbreak there,” said Micaela E. Martinez, a professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “This infection is highly contagious and we have no vaccine, so it will inevitably sweep through our populations unless we have very tight measures in place to prevent that from happening,” Dr. Martinez said. Once it does, the overall health of a community will matter, she added.

Rate of New U.S. Coronavirus Cases Is Declining, U.S NEWS AND WORLD REPORT, May 17

"We're seeing a decline; undoubtedly, that is something good to see," Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University in New York City, told the Times. "But what we are also seeing is a lot of places right on the edge of controlling the disease."

Why Trump’s Comparison of COVID-19 Death Rates in Germany and U.S. is Wrong, SALON, May 15

When compared with many other countries — including Canada, South Korea, Iran, Russia, Poland and Switzerland — the U.S. numbers don't do very well. "We have higher levels of deaths per capita than [those] countries and many others," said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University.
 
Disease Modelers Are Wary of Reopening the Country. Here's How They Arrive at their Verdict., THE WASHINGTON POST, May 14

“The math is unfortunately pretty simple,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a leading epidemiologist at Columbia University. “It’s not a matter of whether infections will increase but by how much.”  To answer that question — by how much? — epidemiologists like Shaman use computer models to project a range of possible futures based on assumptions about the nature of the disease and how society will react to it.
 
Trump’s Comparison Of COVID-19 Death Rates In Germany, US Is Wrong, KAISER HEALTH NEW, May 14

“We have higher levels of deaths per capita than [those] countries and many others,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University.
 
S47 E9: Decoding COVID-19 (video), NOVA, May 13

“When we saw this outbreak, we were struck with the rapidity with which it spread geographically within China and how quickly it translocated to other countries around the globe.” Jeffery Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. (11:57 mark)
 
Massachusetts death rate seems to be climbing, but it’s not the full picture, THE BOSTON GLOBE, May 13

The first is a simple lack of complete data. Many cases of COVID-19 are going uncounted. “The cases we are detecting in the US are predominantly people who come to us with symptoms,” said Columbia University professor Jeffrey Shaman, who studies infectious disease transmission and forecasting. “There are a lot of people out there with mild or limited symptoms or with no symptoms. They don’t seek medical care because they don’t know they have the virus. Those cases are going to be undocumented.”
 
Fauci Says U.S. Death Toll Is Likely Higher. Other COVID-19 Stats Need Adjusting, Too, NPR, May 13

"The [under]reporting issue for death numbers is less severe than case numbers, but it still exists," says Sen Pei, a public health research scientist at Columbia University.
 
Jobs Picture will get Worse Before Improving, Treasury Secretary Says, LOS ANGELES TIMES, May 11

Speaking on the same program, Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health said he expected a rebound in coronavirus cases as states proceeded with “patchwork” reopenings. He said much more could have been accomplished in the two months since the outbreak began in earnest in the United States. “We have not used the eight weeks as well as we could have, unfortunately,” Shaman said. “It would have benefited enormously from consistent messaging and a concerted, consolidated plan of attack for actually aggressively and proactively dealing with this virus.”
 
Risk of Reopening US Economy Too Fast: A W-Shaped Recovery, ASSOCIATED PRESS, May 11

Last week, researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health warned that easing stay-at-home orders and allowing people to mingle more freely would mean that “new COVID-19 cases and deaths will rebound in late May.’’ The Columbia researchers predict a resurgence of cases two to four weeks after states begin to reopen.
 
Scientists Expect an Acceleration of Coronavirus Cases as States Reopen, MARKET WATCH, May 11

Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, agreed there would be a “rebound” in cases as a result of the patchwork response from federal and state officials… People who get infected today aren’t seen as confirmed cases for a couple weeks. So the growth of cases won’t be seen until the end of May, Shaman said. “In a lot of the states in which they are loosening restrictions — they are barely hanging on. In some of them, they already have growth of the virus taking place,” he added.
 
Infectious Disease Expert: 'We are Going to See a Growth in Cases' in Coming Weeks, THE HILL, May 10

Columbia University infectious diseases expert Jeffrey Shaman predicted Sunday that the U.S. will see a growth in coronavirus cases in coming weeks as some states loosen restrictions Shaman said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that Trump administration officials have not taken full advantage of the past eight weeks of near-total lockdowns, saying that the period would have “benefitted enormously from consistent messaging” from the White House.
 
How Long Immunity Lasts After a Coronavirus Infection and What that Means for Vaccines, THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, May 10

In one case, the second positive test occurred within a month of the first, so it might have been the same infection, said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health. But generally, it seemed the immune system couldn’t recognize, and fight off, coronaviruses it had encountered just a few months before.
 
Meet The Press, NBC, May 10

Jeffrey Shaman, Director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said, “What I think we are probably going to see over the coming weeks towards the end of the month is we are just going to start to see a growth in cases. It's not going to happen over the next week or two.”
Also covered on the New York Daily News, Marketwatch and The Hill
Referenced by Los Angeles Times
 
Here’s What Public Health Experts Think Our Pandemic Summer Will Look Like, BUZZFEED NEWS, May 8

A Columbia University School of Public Health analysis released on Thursday, for example, projected how US daily coronavirus death rates will change through the middle of June, depending on three scenarios for how people behave in coming weeks. In one scenario…contacts increased by 10% every week in reopened states. … “The dip is very worrisome, people see lower cases and think there isn’t a problem, so they increase their contacts,” which leads to more deaths weeks later, Columbia’s Sen Pei, a coauthor on the analysis, told BuzzFeed News. “We expect people will change their behavior once they see deaths racing upward again,” he said.

Most who recover from coronavirus carry antibodies, study finds, THE NEW YORKER, May 8

This week, a group of researchers at Columbia University’s Department of Environmental Health Sciences released a report projecting that covid-19 cases and deaths will rise significantly if more states continue to lift shelter-in-place orders and reopen businesses. The researchers, who drew from ten weeks of county-level data on daily confirmed cases and deaths, predict a resurgence in covid-19 deaths and incidence beginning in late May, two to four weeks after some states begin to loosen restrictions. “These findings indicate that most states are not well-positioned to re-open their economies and simultaneously control the spread of covid-19 infections,” the report states. 
 
Scientists Are Trying To Understand Whether People Can Be Immune To The Coronavirus, NPR, May 8

Are antibodies actually protecting people from further infection? And if so, for how long? Jeffrey Shaman at Columbia University is one of many scientists exploring that. “This, to me, is one of the big unanswered questions that we have because it really says, what is the full exit strategy to this, and how long are we going to be contending with it?”

Will Antibodies After COVID-19 Illness Prevent Reinfection?, NPR, May 7

"This to me is one of the big unanswered questions that we have," says Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, "because it really says, 'What is the full exit strategy to this and how long are we going to be contending with it?' "

Americans Deeply Wary of Reopening as White House Weighs Ending Covid-19 Task Force, The Washington Post, May 7

Jeffrey Shaman, a top epidemiologist who leads the Columbia group, said it is particularly alarming that states are reopening without first developing the tools needed to detect and control the virus. “The rebound will be masked because of the lag in the system,” he predicted. “By the time you recognize the rebound, it could be too late. Cases will still increase for another two weeks or more.”
 
Ways to Help Older Neighbors and Relatives in Isolation (and How They Can Help You), The Washington Post, May 6

None of these solutions are perfect, but Linda Fried, the dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, said there’s a way to reframe our situation positively as an altruistic act. “We’re not socially isolating; we’re physically isolating,” Fried said over the phone. “Not just to protect ourselves, but to protect our community.”
 
The Virus Is Winning, The New York Times, May 6

A new Columbia University study by Drs. Shaman, Teresa Yamana and Sen Pei of the Mailman School of Public Health suggests that we may face a rebound in deaths by late this month because of the easing of restrictions, just as a model used by the Trump administration shows deaths increasing to 3,000 daily by June 1.
 
Coronavirus Cases, Deaths Projected to Rise as Georgia Reopens, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 6

An approach worked so well in South Korea -- the country of more than 51 million put the novel coronavirus in check while businesses remained open, observed Columbia University Professor Jeffrey Shaman, an expert in infectious disease projections who is with that college’s team of COVID-19 modelers. One reason South Korea’s approach is so powerful is that it identifies and isolates people who are infected before they show symptoms, keeping them from unwittingly spreading the virus. “They’ve really throttled the disease,” he said.
 
Americans Deeply Wary of Reopening as White House Weighs Ending COVID-19 Task Force, The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 6

Jeffrey Shaman, a top epidemiologist who leads the Columbia group, said it is particularly alarming that states are reopening without first developing the tools needed to detect and control the virus. "The rebound will be masked because of the lag in the system," he predicted. "By the time you recognize the rebound, it could be too late. Cases will still increase for another two weeks or more."
 
The Tricky Math Behind Coronavirus Death Predictions, The Wall Street Journal, May 5

The modelers at Columbia University, for instance, make their projections with three different social-distancing scenarios: 20%, 30% or 40% reduction of person-to-person contact in U.S. counties with at least 10 cases, and assume that social distancing increases with more new cases and remains in place indefinitely.
 
New Studies Add to Evidence that Children May Transmit the Coronavirus, The New York Times, May 5

“Are any of these studies definitive? The answer is ‘No, of course not,’” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University who was not involved in either study. But, he said, “to open schools because of some uninvestigated notion that children aren’t really involved in this, that would be a very foolish thing.”
 
Americans Deeply Wary of Reopening as White House Weighs Ending Covid-19 Task Force, The Washington Post, May 5

On Monday, a modeling group at Columbia University — whose work has been used by New York leaders, as well as the White House — released research showing that even a small increase in the contact rate among individuals will lead to a rebound in transmission and an increase in cases, hospitalizations and deaths.“These findings indicate that most states are not well-positioned to reopen their economies and simultaneously control the spread of COVID-19 infections,” the researchers concluded.
 
Trump's 100,000 Dead Projection Gets Muddied by Reopenings, Bloomberg, May 4

“People’s behavior is essentially unpredictable,” said Sen Pei, an associate research scientist of environmental health sciences at Columbia University who is part of a team modeling the coronavirus in counties across the country. “We can’t predict what will happen tomorrow.”
 
Can Survivors Get Reinfected With Coronavirus?, U.S. News & World Report, May 4

For the study Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, reported that it was not uncommon for people with coronaviruses (not the one that causes COVID-19) to have repeat infections within one year. But the symptoms in these cases were not severe. Shaman and colleagues looked only at the four coronaviruses that are endemic in humans -- the kind that cause nothing worse than cold symptoms…So it's hard to know whether our experiences with endemic coronaviruses will translate to SARS-CoV-2 -- the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. "It's not the same as these endemic viruses," Shaman said. "But obviously, we can't look at repeat infections with [SARS-CoV-2], because it's new….but  how often reinfections occur, and in what time frame -- may at least give a sense of what could happen with the new virus.
 
FDA Turns Its Attention To Companies Claiming To Have Legitimate Coronavirus Antibody Tests, WCBS-TV, May 4

 “We have to be a little more careful about it, unfortunately. It’s not clear that we are one and done with this virus. We may be subject to repeat infections,” said Jeffrey Shaman of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.
 
Trump Cheers on Governors Even as They Ignore White House Coronavirus Guidelines in Race to Reopen, The Washington Post, May 4

A lack of planning on those fronts could leave states vulnerable if there is another outbreak, said Jeffrey Shaman, one of the country’s leading epidemiologists at Columbia University. “We don’t have the testing. We don’t have the contract tracing. We can’t detect a rebound,” he said. “It’s a really problematic place to be. This is not where we want to be.”
 
DeSantis is Ready to Declare Victory but the Coronavirus Picture in Florida is Still Unclear, CNN, May 4

Epidemiologists warned it is still too early to determine the success of Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ response to the pandemic. Concerns about data, insufficient testing and the ongoing study of whether heat and humidity influence transmission of the virus all suggest to epidemiologists that the coronavirus picture in Florida is still unclear. "There are too many possibilities here," said Jeffrey Shaman, a leading epidemiologist at Columbia University.
 
FDA Authorizes Emergency Use of Remdesivir to Treat Coronavirus, CNN- The Situation Room with Wolk Blitzer, May 1

Wolf Blitzer interviewed Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at the Mailman School of Public Health, on the FDA approving the emergency use of antiviral medication Remdesivir to treat coronavirus patients. Dr. Shaman said he thinks the FDA made the right decision and the drug is a cause of “cautious optimism.”

Sports leagues really want to play games again. They just can’t figure out how., THE WASHINGTON POST, May 1

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, director of the Climate and Health Program at the Mailman School of Public Health, said having stadiums full of fans right now is “just begging for something to go wrong.” 
 
Blood Tests for COVID-19 Antibodies Ramping Up with Reopening Plans, NEWSDAY, April 30

Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University who is modeling the virus, in an email said the state’s antibody tests present “many opportunities for bias.” That’s particularly true, he said, “if the specificity of the test is lower than advertised (even just a small amount); if true infection numbers are low; if lags in the system aren’t accounted for, and if not everyone develops antibodies.”
 
Jeff Skoll's $100M for Covid-19 Builds on Legacy Fighting Pandemics, BARRON’S, April 30

Participant Media, meanwhile, has backed public service announcements, along with Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, that feature Contagion cast members Matt Damon, Kate Winslet, Laurence Fishbburne, and Jennifer Ehle. And it’s launched a campaign called Care For The People Who Care For You in partnership with the National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA). 
 
Baseball is Returning in South Korea — Just Without Fans, High-Fives or Spitting, THE WASHINGTON POST ONLINE, April 29

Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist whose virus forecasts have been cited by the White House, points to South Korea’s response as the blueprint to follow. The country sees only a dozen or so new cases each day, society there is largely open, its economy is humming and the KBO season is about to begin.
 
Researchers Built Various Models To Predict Pandemic Shifts. Right Now, They Show 'A Tremendous Amount Of Uncertainty', WBUR, April 29

Being able to aggressively trace the people contacted by someone who's tested positive for COVID-19 will be the key to controlling the pandemic while reopening businesses and ending social distancing measures, according to Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University….
But at the moment, even mechanistic models are severely limited in their ability to predict how the COVID-19 pandemic will behave once restrictions begin lifting, Shaman said.“We are stuck with a tremendous amount of uncertainty,” Shaman said. “We don’t know what fraction of restaurants will open, and we don’t know how many people would actually go to them if they did open.”
 
The Latest on Coronavirus and Immunity, MEDIUM, April 28

It’s also possible that a person’s immunity to Covid-19 could decrease with time, as Antonio Regalado reported yesterday at the MIT Technology Review. In a study on immunity to common respiratory viruses — including four within the coronavirus family, which SARS-CoV-2 belongs to — researchers at Columbia University found that people can get reinfected with the same virus within a year, or even multiple times in a year. Co-author Jeffrey Shaman told TR that for coronaviruses, “immunity seems to wane quickly,” though it’s not clear yet whether the same holds true for Covid-19.
 
Antibody Tests Support What's Been Obvious: Covid-19 is Much More Lethal Than the Flu, THE WASHINGTON POST, April 28

Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist who has been studying the coronavirus since early in the outbreak…. have developed a model of the coronavirus spread that estimates that only 1 in 12 infections in the United States have been documented in official counts. At that rate, the United States could potentially experience 1 million deaths if half the population became infected and no efforts were made to limit the contagion through social distancing, a vaccine or proven therapeutics, Shaman said. “That’s 20 times worse than a bad flu season.”
 
What if Immunity to Covid-19 Doesn’t Last?, MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, April 27

On prior testing efforts by researchers at Columbia University on different strains of coronavirus, Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences, said “immunity seems to wane quickly ” for the coronaviruses and that “we have some unresolved questions” for the behavior of COVID-19.
 
When Will the Stay-at-Home Orders End?, NEW YORK MAGAZINE, April 27

“It’s not a matter of whether infections will increase, but by how much,” Jeffrey Shaman, a leading epidemiologist at Columbia University, told the Washington Post.
 
Trump is Driving Birx to a Tough Spot. It's About to Get even Tougher., CNN, April 27

Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health sciences professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said it is hard to say what level of testing "will be sufficient in our society, particularly as the virus is so widespread."
"A doubling of testing is a start but may be insufficient," he said in an email to CNN when asked about Fauci's estimate. "Regardless these efforts need to be supported by effective contact tracing, which requires a bevy of trained personnel." Shaman added that testing needs will change as the economy re-opens: "Should chefs and waiters at restaurants be tested every day? Every week? What about dentists and bus drivers? Ideally, we would have abundantly available testing and protocols for testing many professions routinely," he said.
 
Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not, THE NEW YORKER, April 26

Jeffrey Shaman, a disease modeller at Columbia, said, “All you had to do was look at the West Coast, and you knew it was coming for us. That’s why Seattle and San Francisco and Portland were shutting things down. But New York “dithered instead of telling people to stay home.”
 
Reopening of America Accelerates as States Prepare to Relax Coronavirus Restrictions, THE WASHINGTON POST, April 25

The article quotes Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences, who cautioned against this decision because “we don’t have the resources in place to do the level of testing and contact tracing we need to make sure we’re monitoring this effectively,” he said. “We’re flying blind.”
 
How Overly Optimistic Modeling Distorted Trump Team’s Coronavirus Response, POLITICO,
April 24

“You can’t oversell the models, and you have to view them within the correct context,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a coauthor of Columbia University’s coronavirus model, who warned of the difficulty in making projections based “on a highly fluid situation for which the information is woefully incomplete.”
 
White House Promotes New Lab Results Suggesting Heat and Sunlight Slow Coronavirus, THE WASHINGTON POST, April 24

“If true, these results would point to preferred transmission in winter indoors (where we spend 90 percent of our time) when the air is dry. It suggests that in summer we could see some drop in virus activity in the Northern Hemisphere (again indoor humidity — both [relative humidity] and [absolute humidity] — is higher in summer),” said Jeffrey Shaman, a leading infectious disease expert at Columbia University.

White House promotes new lab results suggesting heat and sunlight slow coronavirus, THE WASHINGTON POST, April 24

“If true, these results would point to preferred transmission in winter indoors (where we spend 90 percent of our time) when the air is dry. It suggests that in summer we could see some drop in virus activity in the Northern Hemisphere (again indoor humidity — both [relative humidity] and [absolute humidity] — is higher in summer),” said Jeffrey Shaman, a leading infectious disease expert at Columbia University, in an email.
 
When Is It Safe to Go Back to Normal? States Weigh Benchmarks, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 23

The article cites Columbia University’s latest projects of the virus, noting that according to their research “if current physical-distancing restrictions were lifted nationwide on May 1, an immediate surge in cases would follow.”  
 
Don't Feel Bad If Your Kids Are Gaming More Than Ever. In Fact, Why Not Join Them?, TIME ONLINE, April 23

Gaming has benefits for people of all ages. According to a 2016 study conducted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, high video game usage among children aged 6-11 was associated with high intellectual functioning and competence in school and fewer relationship problems with peers.
 
States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn, THE WASHINGTON POST, April 22

“The math is unfortunately pretty simple. It’s not a matter of whether infections will increase but by how much,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a leading epidemiologist at Columbia University.
 
What 5 Coronavirus Models Say the Next Month Will Look Like, THE NEW YORK TIMES, Upshot, April 22

“We want them to provide more information than they can,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a co-author of the Columbia model, who said the models were still valuable in showing a range of what could happen. “We have uncertainty on top of uncertainty on top of uncertainty.”
 
Latest COVID-19 projections from Columbia University show mid-May spike if social distancing is relaxed, TECHCRUNCH, April 22

Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health has released updated projections of when we can expect U.S. case numbers of COVID-19 infections to peak and decline, based on different levels of social distancing measures. The updated projects, which take into account the most recent information, show that with around a 30% decrease in social contact we could be nearing a national peak of new cases for now by the end of April — but that if you decrease social contact by just 20%, the picture changes drastically, with a late peak that extends into mid-May and grows the number of new daily cases to as many as 30,000.

The Other Crisis, MANHATTAN TIMES, BYLINE: FREDERICA PERERA, April 22

In the grip of the coronavirus, frightened and distracted, we have taken our eyes off a crisis that is far more serious in terms of its long-term impacts: the “existential crisis” of climate change. COVID should not be an excuse or cover for the weakening of environmental and climate policies. Children would be the biggest losers. They bear the brunt of the emissions of climate-altering carbon dioxide and toxic co-pollutants such as fine particles and vapors from fossil fuel-powered motor vehicles, power plants and industry. … Why are the young so vulnerable? … Frederica Perera, DrPH, PhD is Professor of Public Health and Founding Director of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

It's Time to Flatten The Loneliness Curve For Older Americans, FORBES, April 21

Volunteering is such an important health intervention for older adults that Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, has suggested that Medicare "prescribe and support" programs like AARP Experience Corps, a tutoring and mentoring effort matching older adults and K-3 students in under-resourced public schools. That kind of public health investment could save money in the long run, as older adults stay healthier longer and children get a better start with the confidence that comes from having more caring adults in their corner.
 
New York could possibly ease social distancing in beginning of June, model projects, MARKETWATCH, April 20

MarketWatch referenced a study from Washington University’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, which shows New York and surrounding areas could possibly ease social distancing in early June. However, Jeffery Shaman of the Mailman School of Public Health said “it’s really too soon to tell whether transmission, testing and tracing will get to the levels needed to warrant any change to social distancing in June.”
Dr. Andrew Rundle, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University, also said in the article that “decisions on relaxing social distancing, must also take into account our ability to test, trace contacts and set up quarantine.”
 
New York City’s Coronavirus Deaths Match Demographics in Other Hot Spots, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 18

“This is what we saw out of China, this is certainly what we saw out of Italy, and this is what we’re seeing out of Spain,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “It’s a disease of the elderly.”
 
America's 'new normal' will be anything but ordinary, CNN, April 16 

Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, said South Korea is using "very aggressive" contact tracing which looks into personal credit cards and phone records and car GPS information.  
"The reality is your credit card company is already using this on you," he said. "You signed it when you signed the contract that was in the fine print there, and they were using for whatever the heck they wanted to do with it to make money. And your phone is already using it. That's what all the phone companies do, they track you. And lots of other apps on your phones do also."
 
As Trump lays out reopening plan, governors fear a second coronavirus disaster, BOSTON GLOBE, April 16

“The federal government has to be the force behind getting testing up fast,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University who led a team of researchers modeling the outbreak’s spread. “Having the federal resources behind it consistently in a coherent fashion with a competent leader leading it is desperately needed.”
  
When emissions decrease, people's asthma gets better, FAST COMPANY, April 16

Air pollution has long been linked to health issues, especially asthma. ... health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “Coal-fired power plants emit a number of health-harming pollutants. That includes sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, particulate matter, and mercury as well as other things,” says Joan Casey, lead author of the paper and assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. “But we selected sulfur dioxide as our target because coal-fired power plants far and away are the number-one producers of sulfur dioxide in the United States, whereas they make up a much smaller portion of some of these other pollutants, and so it’s a nice way to be able to track coal-fired power plant-specific emissions.” 
 
When SARS Ended, THE NEW YORKER, April 16

“Seasonality is a universal driver of almost all of our infectious diseases,” Micaela Martinez, an infectious-disease ecologist at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, told me. Martinez’s research focusses on identifying the causal mechanisms behind seasonality. It’s possible, for instance, that, for certain diseases, circadian rhythms matter: because the location of some immune-system cells in the body varies depending on the time of day, longer days could change how the immune system responds to an infection. Martinez stressed how much is unknown about the biology of seasonality. “I hope for seasonal decline,” she said. But, in the case of sars-CoV-2, seasonal factors could be outweighed by the scale of the outbreak and the ease with which the virus spreads. 
 
Asthma Sufferers Win When Coal Plants Shut Down, HEALTH DAY, April 16

Researchers were led by Joan Casey, an assistant professor of environmental health sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. They said that Kentucky historically has been among the top five states for high levels of air pollution from power plants. 
  
Retirees are finding creative ways to cope with isolation, MARKETWATCH, April 15

“Being told to stay home all the time isn’t normal living” and can trigger loneliness, said Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and a Next Avenue Influencer in Aging.   
   
California Set the Tone on Coronavirus Shutdowns. What’s Its Next Move?, NEW YORK TIMES, April 14
 
Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, noted that it was likely that some aspects of West Coast culture helped mitigate the early spread of the virus. “But that does not argue, he said, for car congestion as a cure-all.” 
  
When coal plants decrease pollution or shut down, people have fewer asthma attacks, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH NEWS, April 14

"We saw about three fewer emergency department visits and hospitalizations per quarter per zip code," Joan Casey, assistant professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and lead author on the study, told EHN. "That translates into about 400 prevented asthma-related hospital visits per year across the county." 
  
Computer models are front and center in coronavirus era, NEWSDAY, April 12
  
Dr. Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia cautioned that models “aren't forecasts, they're projections. We're dealing with a situation where we can affect the outcome by what we do today.” 
  
Poverty, pollution and neglect: How the Bronx became a coronavirus 'formula for disaster', ABC News, April 11  

Michaela Martinez, a public health expert at the Mailman School of Public Health, whose lab is tracking the spread of the virus, said the Bronx is carrying the burden in terms of severe cases and that the population “is more invisible and more dispensable, which is to me so unfair.” “In terms of the really severe cases, the Bronx is carrying the burden right now, said Martinez. 
"We need more local options to match the need," Diana Hernandez, a Columbia University public health expert who lives in the Bronx, told ABC News, ... 
 
Can we conquer loneliness in a time of social isolation?, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, OPINION: Linda P. Fried, April 10

In an op ed Linda Fried, the dean of the Mailman School of Public Health, writes about people’s struggles with loneliness during periods of social isolation,  especially among the elderly and people living alone. Dean Fried suggests six tips to overcome these feelings, including being active and ways to stay in touch with family and friends. 
 
Interview with Jeffrey Shaman, CNN, THE SITUATION ROOM WITH WOLF BLITZER, April 10 
 
New map shows the states most at risk of exceeding their hospital capacity during coronavirus, DAILY MAIL, April 10

The team, led by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, says its findings highlight the importance of preparing hospitals and continuing social distancing measures to make sure the cases and deaths don't skyrocket.
 
Dramatic Changes in Behavior Produce Flickers of Optimism, THE NEW YORK TIMES, April 9

The governor’s very qualified sense of progress is shared by Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University who is advising New York City. “There’s some room for some optimism on this front,” Dr. Shaman said. But he also warned that “we should not be exuberant and not get ahead of ourselves,” and said that another two weeks may tell whether New York’s curve is undeniably flattening.
 
As social distancing shows signs of working, what’s next? Crush the curve, experts say., THE WASHINGTON POST, April 9

“This virus will rebound if there are enough susceptible people in the population,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. “Susceptibles are the tinder for this fire. The virus will come into the community if the community goes back to its normal ways of doing thing.”
 
Optimism Is Less Distant as Global Coronavirus Battle Rages On, NEW YORK TIMES, April 9

The governor’s very qualified sense of progress is shared by Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University who is advising New York City. 
“There’s some room for some optimism on this front,” Dr. Shaman said. But he also warned that “we should not be exuberant and not get ahead of ourselves,” and said that another two weeks may tell whether New York’s curve is undeniably flattening.
 
How Scientists Create Models For Disease, And What The Latest Ones Say, NPR, April 8

The other model, which the administration has also consulted, was put together by a team at Columbia University that includes Jeffrey Shaman. And he tells me that their projections only look at what happens six weeks out, but they find that a lot of those states I just mentioned won't hit their peak number of daily deaths until at least mid-May, maybe longer. And even if those states take much more drastic steps to social distance, it'll be more like late this month before daily deaths peak there.
 
Adjusting Daily Routines During the Pandemic, NEXT AVENUE, April 7

April 7, 2020 - “Being told to stay home all the time isn’t normal living” and can trigger loneliness, said Dr. Linda Fried, dean of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and a Next Avenue Influencer in Aging.
 
US: Retired doctors, medical students volunteer against COVID-19, AL-JAZEERA, April 7

Susan Michaels-Strasser on US: Retired doctors, medical students volunteer against COVID-19.
 
Bias and Health Care Don't Mix: Samaritan's Purse Shouldn't Be Welcome in New York, Not Even to Treat the Coronavirus, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, OPINION: Terry McGovern and Emily Battistini, April 7

The makeshift field hospital recently erected in Central Park will begin to treat critically-ill respiratory patients overflowing from nearby Mount Sinai. This would be wonderful news were it not for the fact that this outpost is being staffed and administered by Samaritan’s Purse, a Christian fundamentalist group led by notoriously anti-LGBTQI and Islamophobic preacher Franklin Graham. Graham is specifically recruiting Christian medical staff to serve in the Central Park facility — and all volunteers, including health-care workers, are being asked to adhere to a statement of faith…” There is also widespread worry that the organization provides sub-standard clinical care.

Scientists ask: could summer heat help beat Covid-19?, THE GUARDIAN, April 5

The arrival of spring does not only affect the behaviour of a virus, however. It also produces changes in the human immune system, other researchers point out. … However, the impact of seasons on cell rhythms is still under investigation, added the study’s leader, Micaela Martinez of Columbia University. Results would be of considerable importance, she added. “Knowing the vulnerabilities of our body to diseases and viruses across the year could inform the timing of vaccination campaigns that will help us eradicate infections.”
 
Tensions Persist Between Trump and Medical Advisers Over the Coronavirus, THE NEW YORK TIMES, April 3

“The growth rate in New York City is slowing. We do have evidence that measures we put in place two or three weeks ago may be having an effect,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. Data from Seattle and San Francisco, he said, shows “they’ve slowed it in spots.”
 
Virus hot spots in South poised for disproportionate suffering, POLITICO, April 3

Hot spots like St. John the Baptist are erupting across the South. The virus is also poised to consume the area around Norfolk, Va., a rural county in Tennessee just north of Nashville and parts of southwest Georgia near Albany, according to models assembled by Columbia University epidemiologists. And without the resources of major cities, these areas are poised to see disproportionate suffering, economic hardship and death when cases peak.
 
America’s Hospital System Is About to Be Severely Tested by Coronavirus. Just Look at New York., BARRON’S, April 3

“There’s no way to overprepare for this,” says Dr. Neil Schluger, a professor of epidemiology, environmental health sciences, and medicine at the Columbia University Medical Center, who has been treating Covid-19 patients for the past two weeks. “The volume really is overwhelming.”
“Places like Colorado can’t have a Navy ship sail in to provide additional beds,” says Charles Branas, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health.
“Hospitals should be thinking about how they can safely use as much space as they possibly can in their hospital,” says Columbia’s Schluger. It is not just ventilator supplies that will be stretched to their absolute limit. Drugs used to sedate intubated patients may run low. Many Covid-19 patients go through renal failure and need to be supported by a type of specialized dialysis machine.
As ventilator availability runs out, hospitals and health officials need to offer clarity about how rationing decisions will be made. “If that comes to pass, then it will be important for public health officials and hospitals to communicate very clearly with the public about how that’s going to work,” says Columbia’s Schluger. “Nobody wants to be in that position at all.”
 
Asymptomatic people may be fueling the coronavirus spread, LIVE SCIENCE, April 3

Part of the reason is that people with mild cases or asymptomatic cases likely have lower amounts of virus in their systems that they could shed, co-author Sen Pei, an associate research scientist at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

Experts and Trump’s Advisers Doubt White House’s 240,000 Coronavirus Deaths Estimate, The Washington Post, April 2

“Repurposing a [car] plant to make ventilators is great, but honestly — I’m not one to cast stones — but it could have been done earlier,” said Jeffrey Shaman, the Columbia University epidemiologist whose models have been reviewed by the White House. But Shaman doesn’t think the White House’s death projection is too low, nor does he think it’s too late to act decisively. “I think we can come in under 100,000 deaths. I do,” he said. “The jury is not yet in on this.”
 
Will COVID-19 become a seasonal disease like the flu? It's too early to tell, experts say, CBC NEWS (Canadian Broadcasting Company), April 2

"We do know that ambient conditions — and it seems to be particularly humidity — modulate the survival ofthe influenza virus," said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor at Columbia and director of its climate and health program. "Now why that is, we don't know. But it's something that's been observed over and over again."
 
“Silent Carriers” Are Helping Spread The Coronavirus. Here’s What We Know About Them., BUZZFEED NEWS, April 2

To Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease expert at Columbia University, the simpler and more important distinction is between “documented” versus “undocumented” cases — the latter being all infected people who aren’t diagnosed. Those could include a person who is very sick but “hates to go to the hospital or Shaman, the Columbia infectious disease expert, thinks the proportion of undocumented cases — infected people who are not officially diagnosed — could be as high as 86% in some places, meaning that these “invisible” cases are driving the pandemic. See a doctor and toughs it out at home,” he told BuzzFeed News.
 
Coronavirus Quarantine FAQ, WBUR, April 1 
 
Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. 
 
Rising sea levels leave public housing residents struggling with mold, POPULAR SCIENCE, April 1

Alongside exposure to pests, such as cockroaches, and air pollution from vehicles, “mold is probably an important component in the total picture of what leads to a higher burden of asthma in low-income communities,” says Matthew Perzanowski, an associate professor of environmental health at Columbia University who studies asthma.
 
Infected but Feeling Fine: The Unwitting Coronavirus Spreaders, THE NEW YORK TIMES, March 31
 
“There’s no standard definition for it, and you could say to yourself, Well, that’s kind of ridiculous: You either have symptoms or you don’t,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious diseases expert at Columbia University. But studies by his team have shown, he said, that some people never notice their symptoms, others are unable to distinguish the infection from their smoker’s cough or allergies or other conditions, and still others may feel every pain acutely. 
 
Coronavirus: Contagion cast share Covid-19 advice, BBC News, March 31

The social media campaign came about after Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health contacted the Contagion cast and asked if they'd be willing to have a virtual reunion to do some public service announcements. 
 
Mystery In Wuhan: Recovered Coronavirus Patients Test Negative ... Then Positive, NPR ONLINE, March 27
  
"There are false positives with these types of tests," Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, told NPR by email. Shaman recently co-authored a modeling study showing that transmission by individuals who did not exhibit any symptoms was a driver of the Wuhan outbreak. 

 
Scientists behind a new study, published earlier this month in the journal Science, have found that for every confirmed case there are likely five to ten more people in the community with an undetected infection. This will likely remain the case. “The testing is not near adequate,” one of the study’s authors, Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental-health sciences professor at Columbia University, said. Comments from emergency-room doctors have been circulating on social media like S.O.S. flares. One, from Daniele Macchini, a doctor in Bergamo, north of Milan, described the situation as a “tsunami that has overwhelmed us.”
 
 
Testing only the sickest impedes public health priorities like prevention, says Gary Miller, vice dean for research strategy and innovation at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “We don’t want people to end up in the ICU, or to be on ventilators,” he said.
 
 
Four types of mild coronaviruses that cause the common cold, also follow the same pattern. 'They phase like influenza, peaking in Jan/Feb and disappearing in summer," said Jeffrey Shaman, director of the climate and health program at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, said.
 
 
Dr. Saito said that part of Japan’s seeming resistance to infection may result from measures common in the culture, including frequent hand-washing and bowing instead of shaking hands. People are also much more likely to wear masks on trains and in public spaces. “It’s a kind of social distancing,” Dr. Saito said. … But Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University and the senior author of a report that projected five to 10 undetected cases for every confirmed infection of the coronavirus based on data from China, said Japan’s approach was a “gamble.” “The risk is that things may be brewing underneath the surface that you don’t recognize until it’s also a little bit too late,” Dr. Shaman said.
 
 
Jeffrey Shaman, the director of the climate and health program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said laboratory studies that investigate how the virus behaves in different environments will provide more meaningful insights into covid-19, compared to the statistical studies looking at temperatures and virus spread.
 
 
The U.S., with its large population and decentralized government, will require a far greater effort, but it's not impossible, says Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University."They were doing [tens of thousands] a day in South Korea," he says. "So why the hell can't we do 10 times that?"
 
 
Mild cases are about half as infectious as those with more severe symptoms, said senior researcher Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. But because there are so many more mild cases, they "are driving the spread and growth of the outbreak," Shaman said. "The virus thrives off the ability for people to mingle and meet each other," Shaman said. "Coming into contact unnecessarily at this point is something that people should really consider restricting."
 
 
“First you get the one big pandemic wave, and then it will start to settle in,” said infectious-disease ecologist Micaela Martinez at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.  “Even if we get a seasonal decline [this summer] in the transmission rate, it could get swamped because there are so many susceptible people.”
 
 
Here’s what Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University, one of the authors of that paper, said about that in a news briefing last week: “These undocumented infections were … about half as infectious per person as a documented case who has more severe symptoms and maybe shedding more. Because, however, there are many more of these undocumented cases, it’s the undocumented infections that are driving the spread and growth of the outbreak.”
 
 
“That’s what’s really driving the spread of this virus, all this silent or stealth transmission,” said Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental sciences at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. … Likewise, the number of cases in the U.S. is also likely to be higher than the official toll, said Dr. Shamanand other experts. How much higher won’t be known, however, unless public-health authorities expand testing, including to people who don’t show any symptoms.
 
 
"You should be testing as much as possible," Columbia University researcher Jeffrey Shaman told Brumfiel. "Because that informs people to stay home. If they are themselves infected and they're mild symptomatic, you tell them, 'You're staying home for the next 14 days or 21 days — and just do it.' "
 
 
The team from Columbia University drew on a database of known cases and linked it to traveling patterns, the paper reported. People who do not have symptoms or are only displaying mild symptoms are most likely to pass it on, with each infected person giving it to an average of 2.2 other people.The study found that there could be up to 11 times more COVID-19 cases than reported ones, with Jeffrey Shaman, who led the research telling the paper, "We're looking at something that's catastrophic on a level that we have not seen for an infectious disease since 1918."
 
 
The Columbia University infectious diseases researcher and study lead for the new report, Jeffrey Shaman, called this phenomenon “stealth transmission” and said it was a “major driver” of the spread of COVID-19. He added that this mode of transmission has remained “substantially undetected, and it’s flying below the radar.” Shaman’s study simulated a transmission landscape that represented 375 cities in China 
 
 
“We need more experiments like this, in particular, extending the experimental sampling time for aerosolized virus beyond three hours and testing survival under different temperature and humidity conditions,” said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an environmental health sciences expert at Columbia University.
 
 
To find out more about how the change of seasons might affect the spread of the virus, CBS News spoke with Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, an expert on infectious disease transmission and director of the Climate and Health Program at Columbia University. The following is an abbreviated version of the conversation.
 
 
"The explosion of COVID-19 cases in China was largely driven by individuals with mild, limited, or no symptoms who went undetected," study co-author Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said. "Undetected cases can expose a far greater portion of the population to [the] virus than would otherwise occur. … These 'stealth transmissions' will continue to present a major challenge to the containment of this outbreak going forward," Shaman said.
 
 
Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, and one of the authors of new report on spreading of coronavirus joins Morning Joe to discuss the number of undetected infections.
 
 
“What you are looking at is just the tip of the iceberg, and the question is: how much of the iceberg is submerged?” said Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University environmental sciences professor who coauthored a new study on the scale of undetected cases of COVID-19.
 
 
“If we have 3,500 confirmed cases in the U.S., you might be looking at 35,000 in reality,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University and the senior author of the new report, which was posted by the journal Science. The report is among the first to address two of the most pressing questions about the pandemic: How many people are walking around with unrecognized infections, and how infectious are they?
 
 
The new effort to ascertain the role of infected people with few or no symptoms offers some insight into how quickly the coronavirus would spread through a population given free rein. “Stealth transmission” is not only real but a “major driver” of the epidemic, said Columbia University infectious diseases researcher Jeffrey Shaman, who led the study published Monday in the journal Science. Its contribution to the virus’ spread “is substantially undetected, and it’s flying below the radar.”
 
 
People who experienced mild, limited or no symptoms were not detected but spread the virus anyway. “Per person, these undocumented infections were 55% as contagious as the documented infections. About half as infectious per person as a documented case who has more severe symptoms and maybe shedding more,” Prof. Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University, New York, and one of the corresponding authors of the paper, said during a press briefing.
 
 
Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, addresses school closings in New York 
 
 
The rapid spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in China can largely be explained by undetected "stealth transmissions"—or cases in which symptoms were not severe, according to a study. Scientists from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health used advanced computer simulations to mathematically model the spread of the novel coronavirus for a paper published in the journal Science.
  
Coronavirus Is Hiding in Plain Sight, New York Times, March 16
 
“If we have 3,500 confirmed cases in the U.S., you might be looking at 35,000 in reality,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University and the senior author of the new report, which was posted by the journal Science.
 
 
Public health scientists at Columbia University used a mathematical model, packed with travel data and the latest information on the incubation period.
 
 
Instead, they were paid volunteers in a study led by infectious disease ecologist Micaela Martinez of Columbia University to investigate a phenomenon ...

Norwegian Cruise Line managers urged salespeople to spread falsehoods about coronavirus, THE WASHINGTON POST, March 12 
 
Jeffrey Shaman, the director of the climate and health program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said there has been no clear evidence to suggest that the coronavirus that causes the covid-19 disease is less transmissible at higher temperatures. The ongoing pandemic, he said, could last straight through the summer in the United States and Europe. 

Coronavirus may have a seasonal cycle, but that doesn’t mean it will go away this summer, experts warn, THE WASHINGTON POST ONLINE, March 11 

Jeffrey Shaman, the director of the climate and health program at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, said that the novel coronavirus may exhibit a seasonality but that this is far from clear. “Given that it is a newly emerged virus to which most of the world is susceptible, I don’t think it will abate in April. Rather, it might ramp down in the U.S. in late May or June,” he said via email. 

Can You Catch the Coronavirus From Handling Cash?, CBS NEWS ONLINE, March 9 

Some doctors say better safe than sorry. "Droplets can live on surfaces, including subway seats and dollar bills. It seems like it could be a path for transmission because it's something people commonly share and handle," said Dr. Jeffrey Shaman, professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.   

The Comic Con at the Epicenter of the U.S. Coronavirus Outbreak Finally Got Canceled, VICE, March 6 
 
“This thing has huge pandemic potential, meaning that it really could sweep the world and 50% to 70% of the world’s population could be infected within a couple of years,” Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health at Columbia University told VICE News. The goal, Shaman says, is to avoid getting into a scenario where hospitals operate over capacity and have to take measures like setting up tents outside to treat patients. 
 
How bad will the coronavirus outbreak get in the U.S.?, THE WASHINGTON POST, March 3

It is not certain that the virus will spread broadly across the United States, but there is a consensus that the country needs to prepare for that. “I don’t think we’re going to be able to control it, the same as we’re not able to control flu,” said Jeffrey Shaman, a Columbia University epidemiologist. “The problem is, this is 10 times or maybe 20 times the burden of a typical seasonal flu. Maybe 40 times. That is daunting.”

There's Not Going to Be a Coronavirus Shutdown — Yet, AXIOS, March 1

We still don't know a lot about the coronavirus, and those unknowns make even the best contingency planning a lot harder. … But "the people who are making those decisions are going to be mindful of the fact that this [virus] can spread very quickly," said Jeff Shaman, an infectious disease expert at Columbia University.
 
Into the Black Box: What Can Machine Learning Offer Environmental Health Research?, Environmental Health Perspectives, February 29
  
“One of the most common questions I get is, ‘What sort of model should I use with my data?’ ” says Marianthi-Anna Kioumourtzoglou, an assistant professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health who uses AI in health studies of chemical mixtures. The answer, she says, is that researchers should start by clearly framing the question they want to answer.
  
How Medical Schools Are Adapting to This Century’s Biggest Health Threat, NEW YORK POST, February 27

The time burden may be eased via shared materials. Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health formed the Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education in 2017 to begin to share ideas on how to train health professionals. To date, it can count some 180 signatories of mostly public-health programs, but also over 20 medical schools and another two dozen nursing programs.

China's health care system under pressure as coronavirus continues to spread, CNBC, February 26

With an estimated 800 million in home isolation the Chinese government has done something very unique, Jeffrey Shaman, professor at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University said. His research includes infectious disease transmission. “It has slowed the outbreak,” Shaman said. “But tin his view that only buys time for vaccines and therapeutic development. At present, a big concern will be outbreaks in hospitals which will be very hard to control in China as elsewhere.”
 
Surge of Hundreds of New Coronavirus Cases Raise Fears of Global Pandemic, The Weather Channel, February 25

“What we find is that this virus is going to be very difficult to contain,” Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University and co-author of the study, told the Post. “Personally, I don’t think we can do it.”
  
CNN Opinion: Under Trump, America Is Less Prepared for a Coronavirus Outbreak, CNN, Byline: Chelsea Clinton and Devi Sridhar, February 24

Unfortunately, President Donald Trump has taken actions that many doctors and experts agree will leave the US less prepared to respond to COVID-19. He has eliminated the position of Global Health Czar and has repeatedly proposed cuts important to global health funding -- thankfully that have failed to pass in Congress. Two aspects in particular worry us about the White House's response, or lack thereof. We have a President uninterested in global health concerns, broadly disdainful of experts and recently obsessed with and distracted by his impeachment.
Chelsea Clinton, a co-author of this article, is an adjunct assistant professor of health policy and management at the Mailman School.
 
Coronavirus outbreak edges closer to pandemic, Washington Post, February 21

“What we find is that this virus is going to be very difficult to contain,” said Jeffrey Shaman, an infectious disease researcher at Columbia University and co-author of the study posted Monday. “Personally, I don’t think we can do it.”
“I don’t want to be complacent. I don’t want to say we’re out of the woods,” said Ian Lipkin, a Columbia University epidemiologist who traveled to China recently to assist with the epidemic response and who isolated himself for two weeks after returning. “But I think we’re not in as dire straits as we might be, and that’s because everyone is pulling together internationally.” 
 
Does The New Coronavirus Spread Silently?, NPR, All Things Considered, February 5

"If you have a lot of people who [have a mild disease or are] asymptomatic and not seeking medical care for respiratory illness but are still contagious, you're going to have a very difficult time," says Jeffrey Shaman, a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University. … His study found the coronavirus in the nasal passages of people who didn't report any symptoms, "and it's going to leak out as they're speaking and breathing and coughing and sneezing and wiping their nose," Shaman says. "Whether it's ... a sufficient quantity to make somebody else infectious, we can't discern that from what we've done."
 
Podcast with Dr. Lewis Ziska: Rising CO2 Levels Make Our Food Less Nutritious, Agriculture Adapts by Climate Ai, February 5

Lew Ziska discusses how higher atmospheric CO2 is causing a food and public health emergency in developing countries and talks about the role of food businesses in protecting consumer health & taking the mantle on sustainability.
   
What to Know About the Health impact of Australia Wildfires, The Wall Street Journal (Video), January 16

NASA says smoke from the wildfires in Australia has made a full circuit of the Earth. Columbia University’s Darby Jack explains how this happened and who is at risk.
 
Heavy Traffic Pollution May Affect Kids' Brain Development, REUTERS, January 28

The new findings confirm and extend what’s been seen in other imaging studies, said Darby Jack, an associate professor of environmental health sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. “This is one more piece in a very important puzzle,” Jack said. Other studies have found that children exposed to high levels of traffic-related pollution tend to perform poorly on standardized tests, Jack said. “This study is getting us one step closer to understanding the underlying biology…Taken as a whole, the research connecting pollution to changes in brain development “is getting quite convincing,” Jack said.
 
Sound and the City, Curbed, January 15

Joan Casey, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University, has done several studies on the demographics of noise pollution in the U.S. “We saw there was on average high levels of noise exposure in communities of color, primarily in African-American communities,” says Casey…“We should start monitoring noise more broadly across the country so that we actually understand what the levels are,” says Casey. “Then we could do more detailed health studies, with the aim to inform policymakers to set noise guidelines.” … “Although we did find that in some cities, both the poorest and richest neighborhoods had the highest levels of noise exposure,” says Casey, “due to [the latter] wanting to live close to transit hubs.”