Roll Up Your Sleeves

Protect yourself and your community

About

COVID-19 vaccines are an essential tool in the fight to end the pandemic. The “Roll Up Your Sleeves” public education campaign, featuring community leaders and Columbia University Irving Medical Center employees, encourages all eligible people to get vaccinated to protect themselves and their communities from COVID-19. The PSAs, which will air on broadcast networks, aim to help address inequities in vaccine education and access, particularly among underserved communities hardest hit by this pandemic. Please watch these PSAs and share the critical messages with your family, friends, colleagues, and community. More PSAs and resources will be released in the coming weeks, so stay tuned. 

To create these PSAs, the Columbia Mailman School, the Center for Infection and Immunity and CUIMC teamed up with the New York Task Force for Vaccine Equity and Education, the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, and NY-based filmmakers, including Scott Z. Burns, Jane Rosenthal, and Kerry Orent. We are grateful to the CUIMC employees who volunteered their time to share their powerful stories.

Public Service Announcements

Roll Up Your Sleeves - Long Version

Hear from Columbia University Irving Medical Center employees and community leaders, encouraging eligible people to get vaccinated.

W. Ian Lipkin, MD

Director, Center for Infection and Immunity, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

Robert Fullilove, EdD

Professor, Associate Dean, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

Jennifer Jones Austin

CEO, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies

Jeffrey Bailey, MSN, RN

Columbia Nursing student, Clinical Coordinator, Hematology/Oncology, Columbia School of Nursing

Chia-Ling Nhan-Chang, MD

Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Hazel Dukes

President, NAACP New York State Conference

Bishop Orlando Findlayter

New Hope Christian Fellowship

Rev. Johnnie Green

Pastor, Mount Neboh Baptist Church

Fianmy Guzman

Ophthalmic Technician, Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Ashley Peek

Security Officer, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Olajide Williams, MD, MS

Professor, Chief of Staff, Department of Neurology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Kellie Bryant, DNP, WHNP, CHSE

Assistant Professor of Nursing at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center; Executive Director of the Simulation Center, Columbia School of Nursing

Jeannine Jennette, EdD, MPA

Executive Director, Public Safety, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Maya Rao, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Tsion Firew, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Sokleab Em

Ophthalmic Technician, Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Luis Rodriguez

Manager, Public Safety, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Kiran Thakur, MD

Winifred Mercer Pitkin, M.D. Assistant Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Doris Leddy

Administrative Coordinator, Department of Surgery, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Jason Hallick

Divisional Administrator, Division of Digestive & Liver Disease, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Jessica Giordano, MS

Assistant Professor of Genetic Counseling, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons

Fulp Goudswaard

Lieutenant, Public Safety, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Omar Garcia

Manager, Technology Projects, Public Safety, Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Rabbi Yuda Drizin

Religious Life Advisor, Chabad at Columbia University

En Español

Ana Cepin, MD

Profesor Asistente, Obstetricia y Ginecología, Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos Vagelos de la Universidad de Columbia

Fianmy Guzman

Técnica Oftalmológica, Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos Vagelos de la Universidad de Columbia

Mayra Marte-Miraz

Directora de Operaciones, Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos Vagelos de la Universidad de Columbia

Frequently Asked Questions

What are COVID-19 vaccines and how do they work?

There is no cure for COVID-19. Vaccines, which are a proven and safe way to help your body fight infectious disease, are a critical tool in the battle to end the COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination as the first and best way to protect against COVID-19.

The COVID-19 vaccine works by helping your body create an immune response to the coronavirus without having to experience the illness.

Vaccines train and prepare the body’s immune system to target, recognize and fight off viruses and bacteria.

For more information on how vaccines work, please visit CDC and World Health Organization COVID-19 vaccine.

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective?

The COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective. The vaccines have been tested and studied large-scale clinical trials and there has been intensive safety monitoring - all vaccines must go through this before being approved for use. Even now that the COVID-19 vaccines have been approved for use, assessments are continued to be done by trusted health experts and agencies to ensure their safety and effectiveness.

For more information on vaccines, please visit the World Health Organization.

Are there side effects to COVID vaccines?

As with all vaccines, you may have some side effects, which are common signs that your body is building protection against a disease. These side effects may affect your ability to do some daily activities, but they normally go away in a few days. Some people have no side effects. Reported side effects have primarily included soreness at the injection site, fatigue, muscle aches, headaches, and some instances of fever and chills. If you have experienced severe allergic reactions to other vaccines, please consult with your doctor.

Visit the CDC site for more information on what to expect.

Do I still need to adhere to public health precautions if I’ve been vaccinated?

For the foreseeable future, everyone – including those who were vaccinated – must continue to practice protective behaviors including wearing a face covering, physical distancing, following testing protocols, avoiding nonessential travel, and other measures. This is important since it is not yet known if the vaccines protect against asymptomatic infection and prevent transmission to others. In addition, it will take time to achieve high uptake (estimated at 70-80%) to achieve herd immunity, which is sufficient population-level protection against transmission of the virus.

For more information, please read an interview with Columbia Mailman’s Jessica Justman, MD: Life After Vaccination: What Can People Do Differently?

If I already had COVID-19, do I still need to get vaccinated?

Yes, even if you already had COVID-19, you should still be vaccinated. There are severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and re-infection with COVID-19 is possible.

How are COVID-19 vaccines administered?

COVID-19 vaccines are injected into the upper part of the arm. Before getting vaccinated, you should receive more information about the specific COVID-19 vaccine you will receive.

How can I prevent COVID-19 transmission?

You can protect yourself and your community from COVID-19 by taking public health precautions including getting vaccinated, staying home, washing your hands often, avoiding close contact, wearing a mask, covering coughs and sneezes, and cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces often. Health officials also recommend getting tested for COVID-19 once a month or as recommended by your health care provider or employer, regardless of whether you have symptoms.

Control the Contagion

In Spring 2020, the Columbia Mailman School partnered with the team that brought you the film CONTAGION, including director Steven Soderbergh, writer Scott Z. Burns, along with key members of the ensemble cast, and Participant to share evidence-based information about COVID-19 prevention through public service announcements (PSAs). Watch here.