Manuela Orjuela-Grimm

Manuela Orjuela-Grimm

Manuela Orjuela-Grimm

Assistant Professor
Epidemiology and Pediatrics (in the HICCC) at the Columbia University Medical Center

Office/Address:

722 west 168th Street, Rm 730
new york NY USA 10032
Phone:
(212) 305- 2382
Website address: Email:

Biography

Manuela Orjuela-Grimm is a molecular epidemiologist and pediatric oncologist whose research focuses on vulnerability (including social) to environmental exposures, gene-nutrient/ environment interactions during windows of susceptibility such as pregnancy, early childhood, adolescence and the development of later genetic and epigenetic changes contributing to poorer health outcomes in childhood and adolescence. She leads EpiRbMx, a long standing case control/ case series study examining exposure to methyl donors, folate pathway metabolism and risk for retinoblastoma in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of investigators including the Hospital Infantil de Mexico, the Hospital de Pediatria at the Instituto Mexicano de Seguro Social (IMSS), the Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica (INSP), and the University of Toronto. In collaboration with INSP researchers, Dr Orjuela is involved in multiple studies examining the intersection between food security, folate related dietary intake, dietary diversity and environmental exposures in central Mexico, including in migrants in transit through Mexico, and in recent Mexican immigrants in New York. Interests: social contributors to dietary exposures, gene-nutrient interactions; one carbon donor metabolism; methylation; nutrient and environmental exposures during early life and later genetic and epigenetic effects; dietary assessment in Mexico, in populations in 'active migration', and in migrants from Latin America; effects of acculturation and early life migration on nutrient/ environmental exposures in US Latinos. Language skills: Spanish(native), fluent in French, Italian, German Clinical Expertise: Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease, retinoblastoma

Topics

Education

ScM, 1996, Harvard School of Public Health (Epidemiology)
MD, Yale School of Medicine
BA, Yale College (Spanish)

Columbia Affiliations

Faculty, Department of Pediatrics (Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation
Faculty Affiliate, Center for Mexican and Central American Studies
Faculty Affiliate, Institute of Latin American Studies

Other Affiliations

Member, Children's Oncology Group, (NHL, Epidemiology, Retinoblastoma , Membership, Diversity and Health DIsparities Committee)
Member, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Molecular Epidemiology Committee
Volunteer, Physicians for Human Rights

Honors & Awards

Dr. Alexandro Aguirre Prize, Sociedad Latinoamericana de Oncologia Pediatrica, 1998
American Association for Cancer Research Minority Scholar: Cancer Prevention, 2002
Invited Lecturer First International Symposium on Retinoblastoma, Campinas Brazil, March 2003

Areas of Expertise

Child Health and Development, Cancer, Cancer--Chemical/Environmental Causes, Disparities / Inequalities in Health, Immigrant Health, Underserved Populations, Environmental Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology, Hunger/Food Insecurity, Nutrition, Epigenetics, Gene-Environment Interactions, Genetic Susceptibility, Global Health, Poverty, Refugee Health

Select Urban Health Activities

COMIDITA (Cognitive Outcomes Mexican Immigrants Dietary Intake Toddler Assessment): COMIDITA examines the relationship between toddler nutrition and neurocognitive outcomes in children of recent Mexican immigrants. We are examining the relationship between specific micronutrients and children's performance in neurocognitive assessments. The project involves the Department of Pediatrics, with advising from Fabiola Mejia-Rodriguez at the INSP in Mexico, and Ligi Paul at Tufts University. We have received R21 funding from NIH (NIMHD) as well as pilot funding the Institute of Latin American Studies, and a planning grant (CaMPR) from the CTSA.
Migration and Diet in migrant Mexican women : The Evaluation of Comprando Rico y Sano (CRyS) uses a CBPR based approach, funded by the Community Engagement Resource (CECR) of the Columbia CTSA. We are working in partnership with our community partner the Mexican Coalition, to evaluate the dietary impact of participation in workshops following the UnidosUS/National Council of La Raza curriculum designed to improve healthy grocery purchasing. Our joint project works with community health workers and focuses on Mexican immigrants in the South Bronx and Northern Manhattan.
CAMINANDO: CAMINANDO examines diet, living conditions and risk and protective factors for post migration health in adolescent migrants from Latin America settling in New York. Our multidisciplinary team works with local community partners offering services to migrant teens. We also collaborate with the Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica in Mexico's work on nutrition in young migrants in Mexico. We have received pilot funding from the Columbia Global Mental Health Pilot program, Columbia Population Research Council, and the Institute for Latin American Studies.

Select Global Activities

EpiRbMx, Mexico: Epidemiology of sporadic Retinoblastoma in Mexico, Mexico: This project examines the role that gene- nutrient interactions play in the development of retinoblastoma and RB1 genetic and epigenetic changes. We examine the effect of early life exposure to dietary intake of folate/folic acid, genetic variation in metabolism of folate and genetic and epigenetic changes in RB1 and in the development of sporadic retinoblastoma in central Mexico. A collaboration with the Hospital Infantil de Mexico, the Nutrition Epidemiology group of the Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, the Hospital de Pediatria Siglo XXI of the Instituto Mexicano de Seguro Social (IMSS), and the Instituto de Fisiologia Celular of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico(UNAM).
Prenatal Exposures and Procarcinogenic Mutations: This project evaluates pre-natal environmental exposures that may increase the risk of childhood ALL. We propose to measure chromosomal aberrations a subset of newborns from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) Prospective Cohort Study to gain a greater understanding of the mechanism underlying the development of the first hit in ALL, and to identify exposures that may be causally associated with the development of intermediate genetic changes. A collaboration with the CCCEH and the Institute for Cancer Research, Surrey, UK
METIAB (Measurement of Food Security and Wellbeing in Migrants in Transit), Mexico, Costa Rica: METIAB is a multidisciplinary multisectorial cooperation that seeks to develop informative measurement tools to assess the severity and magnitude of food insecurity in migrants in transit through Mexico. The group includes members from the Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica (Mexico), the Colegio de la Frontera Norte (Mexico), the UN Institutes of Migration (Latin American Regional Office in San Jose, Costa Rica; Mexico Office), the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, and the Casa del Migrante, Saltillo (Mexico). METIAB has received funding from the Institute for Latin American Studies (ILAS)

Select Publications

M Orjuela-Grimm, M Marti Castaner, S Bhatt-Carreno, M A Castro, A Restrepo Henao, Hector Pinilla, D Rodriguez, A Ruiz, M Valentin, A Richey Levine, R Gonzalez, M Zuleta, M Pharel, P Medina, R Lewis-Fernandez, Household composition after resettlement and emotional health in adolescent migrants, Journal of Migration and Health, Journal of Migration and Health, Volume 5, 2022, 100103,ISSN 2666-6235, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmh.2022.100103.
Orjuela-Grimm M, Deschak C, Aragon Gama CA, Bhatt Carreno S, Hoyos L, Mundo V, Bojorquez I, Carpio K, Quero Y, Xicotencatl A, Infante C. Migrants on the Move and Food (In)security: A Call for Research. J Immigr Minor Health. 2021 Sep 20:1–10. doi: 10.1007/s10903-021-01276-7. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34542776;PMCID: PMC8450693.
Alondra Coral Aragon Gama , Cesar Infante Xibille , Veronica Mundo Rosas, Xinhua Liu , Manuela Orjuela-Grimm Relative Severity of Food Insecurity During Overland Migration in Transit Through Mexico PMID: 32749566 J Immigr Minor Health. 2020 Aug 4. doi: 10.1007/s10903-020-01063-w.
Gampel B, Troullioud Lucas AG, Broglie L, Gartrell-Corrado RD, Lee MT, Levine J, Orjuela-Grimm M, Satwani P, Glade-Bender J, Roberts SS. COVID-19 disease in New York City pediatric hematology and oncology patients. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2020 Jun 26;:e28420. doi: 10.1002/pbc.28420. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 32588957; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC7361160.
Manuela A Orjuela, Fabiola Mejia-Rodriguez, Amado D Quezada, Tania G Sanchez-Pimienta, Teresa Shamah-Levy, Josefina Romero-Rendón, Silvia Bhatt-Carreño, M Verónica Ponce-Castañeda, Maria A Castro, Ligi Paul, Salvador Villalpando Fortification of bakery and corn masa–based foods in Mexico and dietary intake of folic acid and folate in Mexican national survey data,The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, nqz224, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz224 Published: 16 September 2019
Orjuela MA, Cabrera-Munoz L, Paul L, Ramirez-Ortiz MA, Liu X, Chen J, Mejia-Rodriguez F, Medina-Sanson A, Diaz-Carreno S, Suen IH, Selhub J, Ponce-Castaneda MV. Risk of retinoblastoma is associated with a maternal polymorphism in dihydrofolatereductase (DHFR) and prenatal folic acid intake. Cancer. 2012 May 30. doi: 10.1002/cncr.27621. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 22648968.
Ramirez-Ortiz M, Ponce-Castaneda MV, Cabrera-Munoz ML, Medina-Sanson A, Liu X, Orjuela M . Diagnostic delay and socio-demographic predictors of stage at diagnosis and mortality in unilateral and bilateral retinoblastoma Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev;February 12, 2014;doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1069 PubMed PMID: 24521997; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4040273.
Mejia-Rodriguez, F, Neufeld LM, Amaya D, Garcia, Guerra A, Orjuela, M Validation of a food frequency questionnaire for retrospective estimation of diet during the first 2 years of life, Matern Child Health J. 2014 Jan;18(1):268-85. doi: 10.1007/s10995-013-1263-4. PubMed PMID: 23532627; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3752306.DOI: 10.1007/s10995-013-1263-4
Orjuela M, Liu X, Miller RL, Warburton D, Tang DL, Jobanputra V, Hoepner L, Suen IH, Diaz-Carreno S, Li Z, Sjodin A, Perera F. Urinary napthol metabolites and chromosomal aberrations in 5 yr old children. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 May 9. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 22573794.
Orjuela MA, Alobeid B, Liu X, Siebert AL, Kott ER, Addonizio LJ, Morris E, Garvin JH, Lobritto SJ, Cairo MS. CD20 expression predicts survival in paediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) following solid organ transplantation. Br J Haematol. 2011 Mar;152(6):733-42. Epub 2011 Jan 30. PubMed PMID: 21275950.

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