Latanya Mapp Frett

Latanya Mapp Frett

Latanya Mapp Frett

Stop being afraid of what could go wrong and start being positive about what could go right.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Population and Family Health

Office/Address:


Website address: Twitter: CV:

Biography

Latanya Mapp Frett is President and CEO of Global Fund for Women. Previously, she was the Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Global, the international arm of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, with regional and country offices in Africa and Latin America. She quadrupled the size of the program in four years to become one of the most innovative and sustainable global health organizations in the field. Ms. Frett worked for eight years as a human rights officer for the United Nations Childre.s Fund (UNICEF) and for 10 years with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Ms. Frett served as a delegate to the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995 and continues to fight for the human rights of women. An attorney by training, she began her career at the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund in Washington, DC. She has received many honors and awards, including two Esteemed Meritorious Honor Awards from the U.S. government and the highest honor in civil service, the Superior Honor Award, from the U.S. State Department. Ms. Frett was one of 30 Foreign Service Officers honored with the Colin Powell Fellowship by then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Ms. Frett currently serves on the Board of Directors at Oxfam America and CHANGE, and is an Adjunct Professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia Universit.s Mailman School of Public Health. Ms. Frett is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow and author of four U.N. human rights reports and manuals. She is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and Alum of ICAP. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She holds a bachelor of arts in government and politics, a maste.s in public policy, and a JD from the University of Maryland. Ms. Frett currently resides in San Francisco with her family.

Topics

Education

BA, 1991, University of Maryland at College Park
MPA, 1994, University of Maryland
JD, 1995, University of Maryland School of Law

Mailman Affiliations

Investigator and Adjunct Asst Professor, Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health

Other Affiliations

Areas of Expertise

Adolescent Health, Community Programs and Outreach, Community-Based Healthcare, Discrimination/Bias, Disparities / Inequalities in Health, Gender Bias, Social / Cultural Issues, Social Factors in Health, Stigma, Underserved Populations, Violence, Women's Health, Conflict and War, Global Health Diplomacy, Global Health, Human Rights, Poverty, Refugee Health, Rural Health, HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Sexuality, Abortion, Contraception, Family Planning, Genital Mutilation, Reproductive Health, Reproductive Rights, Sex Education and Safe Sex, Health Literacy, Health Worker Education, Life-course Approach to Prevention, Public Health Education, Public Health Leadership and Management

Select Urban Health Activities

The Children's Village - Inwood House: Established in 1830, Inwood House was for many years the only organization focused on providing comprehensive services to pregnant and parenting teens and on pregnancy prevention education in New York City. Inwood House merged with The Children's Village in 2016 and the Inwood House programs are now part of Inwood House at The Children's Village. Latanya Mapp Frett was a former Trustee for Inwood House and as such oversaw the successful merger with the Children's Village.

Select Global Activities

Global Fund for Women: Global Fund for Women was founded in 1987 in Palo Alto, California, by four bold women: Anne Firth Murray, Frances Kissling, Laura Lederer, and Nita Barrow. They were convinced that wome.s human rights were essential to social, economic, and political change around the world, for the benefit of us all. Frustrated by a lack of interest in funding wome.s human rights, they founded an organization to fund grass-roots women-led movements directly. They knew that by trusting their grantee partners to tackle the problems they were uniquely qualified to solve, permanent change would happen. They were right. Founding member Anne Firth Murray served as our Founding President from 1986 to 1996. Anne established Global Fund for Women as a leader in wome.s rights funding and expertise. From the start, Global Fund for Women was a public foundation, relying on the generosity of donors to support its critical work. The work caught the publi.s attention. The first grants in 1988 totaled.30,000, but by 1996 grantmaking had grown to.1.2 million. Kavita Ramdas became CEO in 1996, serving until 2010. Under Kavit.s leadership, Global Fund for Women experienced unprecedented growth, with assets increasing from.6 million to.21 million. Her powerful advocacy and thought leadership won hearts and minds, and mobilized resources and attention for wome.s rights. Musimbi Kanyoro joined the organization in 2011, serving as President and CEO until 2019. Under her leadership, Global Fund for Women celebrated a major milestone. surpassing.140 million in total grantmaking. Musimbi focused the organizatio.s program areas and added more comprehensive learning, monitoring, and evaluation. In March 2014, Global Fund for Women and the International Museum of Women (IMOW) merged. The merger brought together Global Fund for Wome.s powerful grantmaking and advocacy expertise with IMO.s skills in awareness raising, online campaigns, and digital storytelling. IMOW was founded in 1997, led by Founding President Elizabeth Colton, and evolved into an innovative online museum inspiring creativity, awareness, and action on vital global issues for women. Elizabeth joins the lineage of founders of the merged organization. Latanya Mapp Frett became the President and CEO in July 2019. Though Global Fund for Women has changed with the times, the philosophy of our founders has remained: trust women. Women are the best agents of change in their communities, and giving them resources and voice can change the world. Explore our case studies for only a few examples of this philosophy in practice, making a real impact.
Oxfam America: Oxfam is a global organization working to end the injustice of poverty. It helps people build better futures for themselves, hold the powerful accountable, and save lives in disasters. Its mission is to tackle the root causes of poverty and create lasting solutions. Nearly one out of every three people lives in poverty. Oxfam sees a future in which no one does. The way Oxfam sees it, poverty is a solvable problem rooted in injustice. Eliminate injustice and you can eliminate poverty. This is not to say it will be quick or easy, but it can be done. Oxfam won't patch a problem and then disappear. Oxfam won't stand by silently and watch others suffer. Instead, Oxfam will stand together against injustice. It recognizes its responsibility to hold the powerful accountable. It sees people's power to change their lives. It disturbs Oxfam that in a world as rich as ours, many of us go hungry or don't have clean water. Many of us can't claim our human rights. It's wrong. And together we aim to do what's right.
Columbia University Global Gag Rule Research: In January 2017, the President reinstated the Mexico City Policy, also informally referred to as the Global Gag Rule (GGR). Given the policy's implications for health, it is critical to track and document the impact of this expanded policy on access to contraception and abortion services, and on related SRH and maternal health outcomes such as HIV and STI testing and treatment, and antenatal care. As an institution that combines the implementation of rigorous research with on-the-ground programming, and has deep partnerships with academic institutions and community-based organizations and NGOs, HDFPH is well positioned to carry out this work. The primary objective of this research is to answer the question, How does the Mexico City Policy affect the provision of and access to SRH services?

Back to Top