Carole Hutchinson

Carole Hutchinson

Carole Hutchinson

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Sociomedical Sciences

Office/Address:


Phone:
347-576-9435
Email:

Biography

Co-Lead, Project REACH, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Dr. Hutchinson is an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Sociomedical Sciences Department of the Mailman School of Public Health. Over the past four years she has taught a popular and highly interactive Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) course as well as designed and taught a seminar course focused on mass incarceration as a public health issue with a focus on both the carceral system's roots in structural oppression as well as showcasing the voices of people directly impacted by this system or working to affect its change. She is the Principal Investigator on an innovative CBPR project using an interprofessional, service-learning platform to explore the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Maria on pediatric asthma in a marginalized community in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Additionally, she is Co-Lead for Project REACH overseen by the Irvin Institute at CUIMC. This project promotes community engagement and health communications skills and hands-on experience for CU students and community-based organizations serving the Upper Manhattan Communities. She is also currently engaged in a pilot study considering quality of life and wellbeing as markers of success for reentry programs serving people returning to society from the carceral realm. Dr. Hutchinson spent more than 10 years working on CDC-funded research projects related to metabolic syndrome in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. As an anthropologist she has used an array of qualitative research methods in her work over the past 16 years and taught courses on this subject at Mt. Sinai Icahn School of Public Health. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Topics

Areas of Expertise

Chronic Disease, Community Programs and Outreach, Disparities / Inequalities in Health, Underserved Populations, Climate and Health, Food Policy, Incarceration and Recidivism, Health Literacy, Urban Health
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