Elizabeth Radin

Elizabeth Radin

Elizabeth Radin

Lecturer
Epidemiology

Office/Address:

ICAP, 60 Haven Avenue, Floor B1
New York NY 10032
Phone:
917-817-9259
Email:

Biography

Elizabeth Radin has 18 years of experience leading global health and international development programs and research. She has worked on projects relating to infectious diseases, nutrition, maternal and child health, health systems strengthening and human development in over 20 countries in Africa and Asia. As a researcher and practitioner, she takes a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding and addressing inequalities in health, particularly in resource-limited settings. Most recently, Dr. Radin served as the Technical Director for the Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (PHIA) Project at ICAP at Columbia University which measures the current status of the HIV epidemic in 15 high burden countries. In partnership with Ministries of Health, these nationally representative studies benchmark each country's progress towards controlling the AIDS epidemic and inform targeted policies and programs. Prior to her work at ICAP, Dr. Radin led country programs for the Clinton Health Access Initiative and consulted for The World Bank, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Oxford. Dr. Radin is currently a recipient of the 2019-20 Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship which is supporting her to work with the Research and Innovation team at the International Rescue Committee to adapt lessons from the global AIDS response for emerging health and humanitarian crises. In addition to academic publications, her writing and comments have appeared in Time, The Atlantic, CNN, Project Syndicate, Columbia Journalism Review and Vox.

Topics

Education

PhD, 2014, University of Oxford, Department of Public Health
MPA, 2006, Harvard University, Kennedy School of Governement
BA, 2001, University of Pennsylvania

Other Affiliations

Areas of Expertise

Big Data, Research Design and Methods, Social Epidemiology, Nutrition, Global Health, Poverty, HIV/AIDS, Infectious Disease, Maternal Health
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