Food for Thought Series: Fall 2016

Food For Thought: Critical Reflections on the Social Sciences and Public Health Series 

From State House to Your House: How Laws and Social Attitudes Shape the Health of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual populations

Mark Hatzenbuehler, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Social Inequalities, presented his research on the impact of stigma and the way it shapes health inequalities in the LGB community, at the Food for Thought lecture series on Sept. 7, 2016. Hatzenbuehler's lecture explored the health impacts of a variety of discriminatory policies in the United States, and the use of social science data to inform public policies and reduce health inequalities. Watch a recording of the full lecture here

 

Mass Incarceration Through a Public Health Lens: Crisis and Opportunity

Image of JoAnne PageJoAnne Page, JD, President and CEO of the Fortune Society, and Bob Fullilove, PhD, Professor in the Image of Robert FulliloveDepartment of Sociomedical Sciences and Associate Dean of Community and Minority Affairs, spoke about mass incarceration at the Food for Thought Seminar Series on Sept. 21, 2016. Page and Fullilove discussed the devastating impacts of mass incarceration in United States, particularly among poor communities of color and people with mental illness. Watch a recording of the full lecture here.

 

TACKLING THE TABOO: ADDRESSING THE MENSTRUAL EDUCATION AND HYGIENE NEEDS OF GIRLS AND WOMEN ACROSS LOW-INCOME COUNTRIES

Marni Sommer, Professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences, spoke at the Food for Thought Seminar Series on Nov. 2, 2016. Sommer discussed her research that expolores girls' experiences of menstruation, puberty and schooling in low-income countries, and the ways in which the onset of puberty might be disruptin girls' academic performance and healthy transition to adulthood. Watch a recording of the full lecture here.

 

 

Symbols in the strangefruit seeds: What the talk Black parents have with their sons tell us about racism

Raygine DiAquoi, EdD, Director of the Office of Diversity Culture and Inclusion (ODCI) and Assistant Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health, spoke about her research on "The Talk" — how African-American parents speak with their children about racism, at the Food for Thought Seminar on Oct. 5, 2016. Watch a recording the full lecture here.